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21st World Congress on Heart Disease

 

 

 

 


21st World Congress on Heart Disease


  IAC MEETINGS

 IAC

International Academy of Cardiology
Annual Scientific Sessions 2016
21st World Congress on Heart Disease



bostonThe Westin Copley Place
Boston, MA, USA
July 30 - August 1, 2016

 

Abstract Deadline extended to:
April 20, 2016


Preliminary Program is now online.

Download as pdf.

CME Meeting
The scientific program of the International Academy of Cardiology, Annual Scientific Sessions 2016, 21st World Congress on Heart Disease has been reviewed by the American Medical Association and approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit.

Publication of Abstracts:
Accepted abstracts will be published in a special online only supplement issue of the journal CARDIOLOGY.

Affiliated with:
American College of Cardiology, California Chapter


The American Society for Preventive Cardiology

International Academy of Cardiovacular Sciences

 

   
         
   
Video from the 16th World Congress on Heart Disease      
 
   
MEETINGS AFFILIATED WITH THE IAC

 


Advances in Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT: 31th Annual Case Review with the Experts with 101 Evidence-based Cases
January 22-24, 2016
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Los Angeles, CA, USA



The 4th International Congress on Cardiac Problems in Pregnancy (CPP2016)
February 27 - March 1, 2016
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA



20th Annual Heart Failure 2016 - Update on Diagnosis and Therapy
April 16, 2016
Los Angeles, CA, USA

 


To see more information on Meetings Offered in Cooperation with the International Academy of Cardiology, click here.

 


 
 PREVIOUS MEETINGS OF THE IAC
 

International Academy of Cardiology
Annual Scientific Sessions 2015
20th World Congress on Heart Disease



vancouverHyatt Regency Vancouver
Vancouver, BC, Canada
July 25-27, 2015


CME Meeting

The scientific program of the International Academy of Cardiology, Annual Scientific Sessions 2015, 20th World Congress on Heart Disease has been approved by the American Medical Association for 22.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.

Photo Gallery.new

Scientific Program.
Download as pdf.

Publication of Abstracts:
Accepted abstracts were published in a special online only supplement issue of the journal CARDIOLOGY.

Affiliated with:
American College of Cardiology, California Chapter

The American Society for Preventive Cardiology

Endorsed by:
The Heart Valve Society


boston International Academy of Cardiology
Annual Scientific Sessions 2014
19th World Congress on Heart Disease


Hyatt Regency, Boston, MA, USA
July 25-28, 2014

CME Meeting
Final Program
Download the final program (pdf)


Photos from the 19th World Congress on Heart Disease (click here to see more photos)

Photo Gallery now online. new

The scientific program of the 19th World Congress on Heart Disease has been reviewed by the American Medical Association and approved for 23.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.

Publication of Abstracts:
Accepted abstracts were published in a special online only supplement issue of the journal CARDIOLOGY.

Affiliated with:
American College of Cardiology, California Chapter

The American Society for Preventive Cardiology

Endorsed by:
Heart Valve Society of America


toronto
International Academy of Cardiology
18th WORLD CONGRESS ON HEART DISEASE
Annual Scientific Sessions 2013

July 26-29, 2013
Hyatt Regency, Vancouver, BC, Canada

CME Meeting
Photo Gallery
Final Program
Download Final Program (pdf)

The scientific program of this Congress has been reviewed by the American Medical Association and approved for a maximum of 25.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.

Publication of Abstracts:
Accepted abstracts were published in a special online only supplement issue of the journal CARDIOLOGY. Click here to view.


Affiliated with:
American College of Cardiology, California Chapter

The American Society for Preventive Cardiology

Endorsed by:
Heart Valve Society of America


 


Photos from the 18th World Congress on Heart Disease (click here to see more photos)

   toronto 

International Academy of Cardiology
17th WORLD CONGRESS ON HEART DISEASE

Annual Scientific Sessions 2012
July 27-30, 2012
The Fairmont Royal York,
Toronto, ON, Canada

Final Program
Final Program (pdf)

Affiliated with
American College of Cardiology, California Chapter

The American Society for Preventive Cardiology

Endorsed by
Heart Valve Society of America

CME Meeting
*Approved by the American Medical Association for a maximum of 23.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.

Sending your Article(s) to Monduzzi Editore - Medimond's Proceeding Book

 

Photos from the 17th World Congress on Heart Disease
(Click here to see more photos)

      
International Academy of Cardiology
16th WORLD CONGRESS ON HEART DISEASE

Annual Scientific Sessions 2011
July 23-26, 2011
Hyatt Regency Vancouver, BC, Canada

Final Program
Final Program (pdf)

Program at a Glance (pdf)

Writing Instructions and Sending your Article(s) to Monduzzi Editore - Medimond's Proceeding Book

Affiliated with the American College of Cardiology, California Chapter

CME Meeting

*Approved by the American Medical Association for a maximum of 32.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.

photos Click here to view photos from the 16th World Congress on Heart Disease


New Horizons in Cardiovascular Disease15th WORLD CONGRESS ON HEART DISEASE
International Academy of Cardiology
Annual Scientific Sessions 2010

July 24-27, 2010
Vancouver, BC, Canada

(click to view index as pdf)

Proceedings Book
ISBN: 978-88-7587-617-3
Available also on CD-ROM


Photos from the 15th World Congress on Heart Disease
(Click here to see more photos)

FINAL PROGRAM
*Approved by the American Medical Association for a maximum of 26.25 AMA PRA Category 1 CME Credits™ 

Endorsed by the American College of Cardiology, California Chapter


Current Advances in Heart Disease14th WORLD CONGRESS ON HEART DISEASE
International Academy of Cardiology
Annual Scientific Sessions 2008

July 26-29, 2008
Toronto, ON, Canada

(click to view index as pdf)

Proceedings Book
ISBN: 978-88-7587-480-3
Available also on CD-ROM

FINAL PROGRAM
*Approved by the American Medical Association for a maximum of 26.25 AMA PRA Category 1 CME Credits™ 

Endorsed by the American College of Cardiology, California Chapter


14th World Congress on Heart Disease

Recent Advances in Cardiovascular Disease 13th WORLD CONGRESS ON
HEART DISEASE

International Academy of Cardiology
Annual Scientific Sessions 2007
July 28 - 31, 2007
Hyatt Regency Vancouver
Vancouver, B.C., Canada

Proceedings Book
ISBN: 978-88-7587-369-1
Available also on CD-ROM


Photos from the 13th World Congress on Heart Disease
(Click here to see more photos)

FINAL PROGRAM & ABSTRACTS
*Approved by the American Medical Association for a maximum of 27 AMA PRA Category 1 CME Credits™  



Advances in Heart Disease INTERNATIONAL ACADEMY OF CARDIOLOGY
12th WORLD CONGRESS ON HEART DISEASE
- NEW TRENDS IN RESEARCH, DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT
July 16-19, 2005
Vancouver, BC, Canada


Proceedings Book
ISBN: 88-7587-192-2
Available also on CD-ROM


 Photos from the
12th World Congress on Heart Disease

[Click here to see more photos]

FINAL PROGRAM & ABSTRACTS
* Approved by the American Medical Association for 26.25 AMA PRA Category 1 CME Credits


To see more information on Previous IAC Meetings, click here.

 

PREVIOUS MEETINGS AFFILIATED WITH IAC

Controversies and Advances in the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease, the Fifteenth in the Series
November 19-20, 2015
Beverly Hills, CA, USA




CARDIOTECHNIX 2015 - 3rd International Congress on Cardiovascular Technologies
November 16-17, 2015
Lisbon, Portugal




International Congress on Echocardiography - “ECHO of the White Nights-2015”

September 17-19, 2015
St. Petersburg, Russia



4th Annual Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Conference (American Socity for Preventive Cardiology)
July 31 - August 2, 2015
Boca Raton, FL, USA

19th Annual Heart Failure 2015 - Update on Diagnosis and Therapy
April 18, 2015
Los Angeles, CA, USA

hsv The Heart Valve Society Inaugural Scientific Meeting
May 7-9, 2015
Monte Carlo, Monaco



Controversies and Advances in the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease: The Fourteenth in the Series
November 20-21, 2014
The Beverly Hills Hotel
Beverly Hills, CA, USA

2014 Arrhythmia Symposium at the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute
December 5, 2014
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Los Angeles, CA, USA




2nd World Congress of Clinical Lipidology
December 5-7, 2014
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Vienna, Austria





18th Annual Heart Failure 2014 - Update on Diagnosis and Therapy
April 5, 2014
Millennium Biltmore Hotel
Los Angeles, CA, USA

New YorkValves in the Heart of the Big Apple VIII: Evaluation & Management of Valvular Heart Disease 2014
May 8-10, 2014
Marriott Marquiz, New York City, NY





cancun
Cardiovascular Disease Prevention 2014: Novel Strategies and Emerging Therapies
February 14-17, 2014
Hilton Molino Stucky
Cancun, Mexico


Venice 3rd International Congress on Cardiac Problems in Pregnancy
February 20-23, 2014
Hilton Molino Stucky
Venice, Italy



Advances in Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT: 29th Annual Case Review with the Experts with 101 Evidence-based Cases
January 24-26, 2014
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Los Angeles, CA, USA



To see more information on Previous Meetings Under the Auspices of the International Academy of Cardiology, click here.

 

  CARDIOLOGY ONLINE NEWS

Invited Speaker Presentations at the
19th World Congress on Heart Disease (cont'd)

(click on the photo to view the video)


 
19th WORLD CONGRESS ON HEART DISEASE

ATORVASTATIN ATTENUATES ATHEROSCLEROSIS IN THE VALVES AND FEMURS FROM HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIC LDLR-/- MICE AS=OP Rajamannan
Nalini M. Rajamannan, M.D., Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA

Atherosclerosis and osteoporosis are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the aging population in the Unites States. Evidence indicates that hyperlipidemia plays a paradoxical role in these disease processes. MORE»

 

ATYPICAL AND UNUSUAL CLINICAL PRESENTATIONS OF PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE Reddy
Hanumanth K. Reddy, M.D., St. Louis University Medical School, St. Louis, Missouri, USA

Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide accounting for 7 million deaths annually. Chest pain is the cardinal symptom in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD). MORE»

 

TRANSLATION OF HDL FUNCTIONALITY INTO CLINICAL PRACTICE
Rosenson
Robert S. Rosenson, M.D., School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA

HDL is conventionally quantified by the cholesterol cargo transported in these protein rich lipoprotein particles. In prospective population studies and clinical trials with low to moderate intensity statins, HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) is biomarker of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk. MORE»

 

 

DEVICE CLOSURE OF COMPLEX ATRIAL SEPTAL DEFECT IN ADULTS- ISSUES AND SOLUTIONS
Sadiq
Masood Sadiq, M.D., The Children's Hospital/The Institute of Child Health, Lahore. Pakistan

A complex ASD is defined as presence of a large- >20mm (stretched diameter = 26 mm) ASD associated with a deficient (= 4 mm) rim located at the anterior, inferior, or posterior portion of the atrial septum, two separate ASDs within the atrial septum (distant or close to each other); and multi-fenestrated septum, defects associated with a floppy, redundant, and hyper mobile atrial septum (excursion = 10 mm), considered to be aneurysmal, irrespective of their size. MORE»

 

BENEFIT AND RISKS OF ANTIDIABETIC TREATMENT IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE AND HEART FAILURE
Saely
Christoph H. Saely, M.D., VIVIT Institute, Academic Teaching Hospital, Feldkirch, Austria

Diabetes mellitus is a paramount risk factor both for coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure, and the prevalence of diabetes among patients with CAD or heart failure is high. While better glucose control epidemiologically is associated with a lower incidence of cardiovascular events, lowering blood glucose failed to lower the incidence of macrovascular diabetes complications, i.e. of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in multiple trials, in particular among patients with established CAD. MORE»

 

 

PHARMACOLOGICAL MODULATION OF ANGIOTENSIN-II-INDUCED ARTERIAL MONONUCLEAR CELL ADHESION BY NUCLEAR RECEPTORS ACTIVATION
Sanz
Maria J. Sanz, Ph.D., Institute of Health Research INCLIVA, Valencia, Spain

The need of effective strategies to treat and prevent atherosclerosis led us to investigate the effect of combined concentrations of Rosuvastatin (Rosu) and bexarotene (Bex) on angiotensin II (Ang-II)-induced arterial mononuclear cell (MC) recruitment. MORE»

 

 

ROLE OF MINOCYCLINE IN MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA-REPERFUSION INJURY: AN OLD DRUG WITH NEW IMPLICATIONS
Scarabelli
Tiziano M. Scarabelli, M.D., Ph.D., St John Hospital & Medical Center/Wayne State University SOM, USA

Minocycline is a semisynthetic second -generation tetracycline with proven safety, which is used in humans for the treatment of acne and urethritis. The drug is also considered for the treatment of severe chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, as it exerts anti-inflammatory effects that are completely separate and distinct from its antimicrobial action. MORE»

 

HIGH SENSITIVITY CARDIAC TROPONIN – A CARDIOLOGIST'S FRIEND OR FOE?
Schaefer
Saul Schaefer, M.D., University of California, Davis, CA, USA

Cardiac troponin I and T (cTnI and cTnT) are components of the cardiac myocyte myofibrillar apparatus that are released when these cells are injured. Current assays set “normal” at levels that incorporate 99% of the non-diseased population, with usual upper limits in the range of 0.05ug/ml. Troponin elevations are useful in diagnosing acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in conjunction with clinical, electrocardiographic, and imaging data. MORE»

 

 

NEW TECHNOLOGIES TO IMPROVE CRT OUTCOME
Seidl
Karlheinz Seidl, M.D., Klinikum Ingolstadt, Germany

CRT has evolved as an established treatment for advanced heart failure symptoms, impaired LV function and intraventricular conduction delay despite substantial improvement in technology and optimization techniques 30% - 40% of pts fail to gain significant clinical benefit. What are the clinical challenges? MORE»

 

EVOLVING ROLE OF PLATELET FUNCTION TESTING IN ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROMES
Sharma
Rakesh K. Sharma, M.D., University of Arkansas Medical Science, Little Rock, AR, USA

The substantial reduction in ischemic events provided by the dual anti-platelet regimen with aspirin and clopidogrel is extensively published in patients with acute coronary syndrome and patient’s undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). MORE»

 

 

REGULATORY T CELLS IN ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSMS
Shi
Guo-Ping Shi, M.D., Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA

Regulator T cells (Tregs) are anti-inflammatory CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells that are impaired in both numbers and activities in human and experimental coronary heart diseases. Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an aortic disease that its pathogenesis involves extensive infiltration of pro-inflammatory cells that release pro-inflammatory cytokines to activate vascular cells and other inflammatory cells, thereby leading to arterial wall remodeling, expansion, and rupture. MORE»

 

IMAGING ACE AND ANGIOTENSIN RECEPTORS IN THE HEART
Shirani
Jamshid Shirani, M.D., St. Luke's Hospital and Health Network, Bethlehem, PA, USA

Angiotensin II (AII), an octapeptide member of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), is formed by the enzyme angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and exerts adverse cellular effects through an interaction with its type 1 receptor (AT1R). MORE»

 

 

STABLE ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE: EVOLVING CONCEPTSAND THE ROLE OF ISCHEMIA
Sidhu
Mandeep S. Sidhu, M.D., Albany Medical College, Albany, NY, USA

The optimal strategy for the management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) has been a matter of considerable debate over the past two decades. During this time period, there have been notable technologic evolutions in catheter-based revascularization that include the advent of bare metal and drug-eluting stents, the genesis of more effective antiplatelet therapy, the continued refinement of stent delivery platforms, improving operator experience and quality improvement initiatives which have led to declining complication rates. MORE»

 

IS THE DASH DIET THE OPTIMAL DIET FOR HEART FAILURE PATIENTS?
Silver
Marc A. Silver, M.D., Advocate Christ Medical Center, University of Illinois. IL, USA

Background: For symptomatic heart failure (HF) the major focus remains evidence based pharmacologics and devices. Little guideline evidence exists for nutritional support of HF patients beyond recommendations on limiting sodium excess. Endothelial dysfunction has been recognized as a pathophysiologic mechanism in the progression of HF. MORE»

 

 

TIME TO FOCUS ON CV HEALTH (NOT CV DISEASE)
Sperling
Laurence S. Sperling, M.D., Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA

Despite rapidly advancing technologies in the treatment of CV diseases the current status of healthcare economics and global epidemiologic trends related to non-communicable diseases are unsustainable. A healthcare transformation is needed with a greater focus on CV health promotion and disease prevention. MORE»

 

ROLE OF ENDOTHELIN-1 AND CAMKINASE II SIGNALING IN CARDIOVASCULAR COMPLICATIONS
Srivastava
Ashok K. Srivastava, Ph.D., CRCHUM, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Vasoactive peptides such as angiotensin II and endothelin-1 as well as growth factors regulate vascular homeostasis through signaling pathways that are triggered in both normal and disease states. These vasoactive peptides and growth factors also increase the cellular levels of calcium which, through calcium binding effector systems initiates the downstream signaling and physiological responses in target cells. MORE»

 

 

ABLATION OF IDIOPATHIC VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA
Srivathsan
Komandoor S. Srivathsan, M.D., Mayo Clinic, Arizona, USA

Idiopathic ventricular tachycardia occurs when ventricular tachycardia occurs in the absence of detectable heart disease. Other than syncope they can cause cardiomyopathy if Premature Ventricular Contraction is frequent. MORE»

 

VASCULAR HEALING & BIORESORBABLE SCAFFOLDS: FROM PLATELETS, LEUKOCYTES TO ENDOTHELIAL CELLS
Tanguay
Jean-Francois Tanguay, M.D., Université de Montréal, Canada

Vascular endothelium damage occurs in acute situations such as following percutaneous coronary intervention or spontaneously plaque rupture. Tissue damages can also result from chronic conditions linked to cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes, dyslipidemia and hypertension, which induce a sustained pro-inflammatory status and impair vascular endothelial cell functions. MORE»

 

 

OLD AND EMERGING OPTIONS FOR TREATMENT OF REFRACTORY ANGINA: A CRITICAL APPRAISAL
Thadani
Udho Thadani, M.D., University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and VA Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA

Patients with refractory angina are considered to be not suitable candidates for a revascularization procedure, and remain symptomatic despite good medical therapy. However, some patients with refractory angina, experience a marked symptomatic relief after adjustment of their antianginal drugs and lifestyle modifications, including regular exercise. MORE»

 

MOLECULAR TARGETING OF DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY
Tuana
Balwant S. Tuana, Ph.D., University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Canada

The E2F/Pocket protein pathway regulates cardiac growth, differentiation, and death. Modulating its activity presents intriguing possibilities for targeting cardiac disease. E2F activation leads to hypertrophy and apoptosis. MORE»

 

 

MITOCHONDRIAL DIVISION/MITOPHAGY INHIBITOR (MDIVI) AMELIORATES PRESSURE OVERLOAD INDUCED HEART FAILURE
Tyagi
Suresh C. Tyagi, Ph.D., University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY, USA

We have previously reported the role of anti-angiogenic factors in inducing the transition from compensatory cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure and the significance of MMP-9 and TIMP-3 in promoting this process during pressure overload hemodynamic stress. MORE»

 

IMATINIB: A NOVEL CANDIDATE FOR TREATMENT OF PERMEABILITY EDEMA
van Nieuw Amerongen
Geerten P. van Nieuw Amerongen, Ph.D., VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Endothelial hyperpermeability and vascular leakage are significant pathogenic phenomena. Although contributing to life-threatening conditions like acute respiratory distress syndrome, they currently lack specific therapy. In a case-report we reported fast resolution of pulmonary edema upon treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib. MORE»

 

 

PERICUTANEOUS HEMODYNAMIC SUPPORT FOR HIGH RISK PCI: INDICATIONS AND RESULTS
Vetrovec
George W. Vetrovec, M.D., VCU Medical Center Richmond, VA, USA

Hemodynamic support has a limited but very specific and important role in the management of myocardial ischemia in the cardiac catheterization lab. Indications for its use include (1) cardiogenic shock, particularly in the setting of Acute Myocardial Infarction in which case the immediate support provides the time and hemodynamic stability to complete revascularization. MORE»

 

GENDER DISPARITY IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE: BIAS, BIOLOGY, OR BOTH?
Wenger
Nanette K. Wenger, M.D., Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA

Cardiovascular disease remains a major cause of mortality for women both in industrialized economies and in developing nations. A stunning improvement has occurred in cardiovascular disease mortality for U.S. women between 2000 and 2010, attributable both to application of evidence-based therapies of established cardiovascular disease and to preventive interventions; these likely derived from research studies of cardiovascular disease in women. MORE»

 

 

NEW GUIDELINES ON CARDIOVASCULAR RISK ASSESSMENT
Wong
Nathan D. Wong, Ph.D., University of California, Irvine, CA, USA

The Framingham Heart Study first noted that risk functions for predicting cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk provide an efficient way for identifying persons at high risk who need preventive therapy; this led to future recommendations regarding the targeting of the intensity of therapy to a patient’s global risk. MORE»

 

IMPROVING ENERGY SUPPLY TO MEND A SICK HEART
Yang
Qinglin Yang, M.D., Ph.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA

Substrate supply to the heart plays an essential role in maintaining cardiac performance. Perturbations in energy metabolism have been linked to pathological cardiac hypertrophy and failure. However, our understanding of the regulation of substrate utilization in the adult heart remains poor. MORE»

 

 

CILIA AND CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE: WHAT IS THE CONNECTION?
Zahid
Maliha Zahid, M.D., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Motile cilia at the embryonic node and in the respiratory tract are required for left-right patterning and for muco-ciliary clearance from the respiratory tract, respectively. The heart is one of the most asymmetric organs in the body in order to support two separate circulation systems, the pulmonary and systemic circulation, in parallel. MORE»

 

 

INTEGRATING NUTRITION EDUCATION INTO THE CARDIOVASCULAR CURRICULUM CHANGES MEDICAL STUDENT EATING HABITS
Zelis
Robert Zelis, M.D. Pennsylvania State University, Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USA

Background and Objective: Surveys of medical student curricula continue to demonstrate that nutrition education is not universally adequate. One measure of nutritional educational competence is a positive change in student eating habits. MORE»

DISCOVERY OF A NEW INDEX OF DUAL PATHWAY ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE CONDUCTION
Zhang
Youhua Zhang, M.D., Ph.D., New York Institute of Technology (NYIT) College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury, NY, USA

Dual pathway atrioventricular (AV) node electrophysiology is the basis of AV nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT). Current clinical criterion for dual pathway conduction is a discontinuity or “jump” in the AV conduction curve. MORE»

 

Click here to see Invited Speaker Presentations from the International Academy of Cardiology, Annual Scientific Sessions 2014, 19th World Congress on Heart Disease

Invited Speaker Presentations at the 18th World Congress on
Heart Disease (cont'd)


 
18th WORLD CONGRESS ON HEART DISEASE

PROTEIN TRANSDUCTION DOMAINS; TARGETED VS. NON-TARGETED TISSUE DELIVERY
ZahidMaliha Zahid, M.D., University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

The ability of certain proteins to cross cell membrane barriers was a chance finding reported over 20 years ago. This ability, also termed protein transduction, is localized to 6-30, basic, cationic peptide motifs, known as protein transduction domains (PTDs). MORE»

OMEGA-3 SUPPLEMENTATION IMPROVES ARTERIAL STIFFNESS AND BIOMARKERS OF CV RISK IN LATINO AND WHITE PATIENTS WITH HYPERTENSION SERVED BY A SAFETY-NET HEALTHCARE SYSTEM
Long Carlin S. Long, M.D., University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO, USA

We previously reported on a cross sectional study of Latino and White hypertension patients in a safety-net healthcare system in which Framingham risk factors, markers of inflammation (hsCRP, LPpLA2), arterial stiffness (Pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, and central aortic pressure), and endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation) were measured. MORE»

THE EVOLUTION OF THE PACING SITE: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE
Oginosawa
Yasushi Oginosawa, M.D., University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Yahatanishi, Kitakyushu, Japan

As cardiac pacing system for bradyarrhythmias has been developed in clinical practice over half century, the preferential pacing site has been also evolved.[PAST] In the early stage, the object of the pacing was only maintenance of heart rate and pacing lead has been implanted to right atrial appendage and/or right ventricular apex for easiness in terms of implantation and the stability even using conventional passive fixation lead. MORE»

PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF TELMISARTAN AGAINST ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION AFTER CORONARY DRUG-ELUTING STENT IMPLANTATION IN HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS
Terashima Mitsuyasu Terashima, M.D., Toyohashi, Japan

Objectives: The aim of this prospective, randomized study was to evaluate the effects of telmisartan on endothelial function after coronary drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation in hypertensive patients, compared to a calcium channel blocker, amlodipine. MORE»

HUMAN ENTEROVIRUS PERSISTENCE: POTENTIAL FOR EXACERBATION OF MYOCARDITIS
Chapman
Nora M. Chapman, M.D.,
University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA

Human enteroviruses like the group B coxsackieviruses (CVB) are known to cause human inflammatory cardiomyopathies but until recently, the CVB were thought to be acute infections, rapidly cleared by the host's immune system. We discovered that CVB can persist for weeks to months following either experimental inoculation (in cell cultures or mice) or natural infection (humans) through a mechanism that involves the loss of the 5' terminal genomic sequence. MORE»

NEUTROPHILS IN ACUTE CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE
Filep
Janos G. Filep, M.D.
, Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Neutrophil granulocytes are present in atherosclerotic lesions and contribute to inflammatory tissue injury underlying all phases of atherosclerosis from nascent lesions to culmination in acute coronary artery disease (CAD). Acute CAD is characterized by widespread neutrophil accumulation, neutrophil infiltration of culprit lesions and prolonged neutrophil lifespan. MORE»

CRYPTOGENIC STROKE - COULD LONG TERM CARDIAC MONITORING UNCOVER THE CAUSE Gimbel
J. Rod Gimbel, M.D., Knoxville, TN, USA

"Cryptogenic Stroke" is defined as an ischemic stroke that is not attributable to a cardioembolic source or large or small vessel disease whose cause remains undetermined after an extensive cardiovascular and hematologic search for the cause. Approximately, 20-25 % of ischemic strokes are "cryptogenic" with some due to unrecognized or undetected atrial fibrillation. MORE»

MACROPHAGES TRANSMIT POTENT PROANGIOGENIC EFFECTS OF oxLDL IN VITRO AND IN VIVO INVOLVING HIF-1a ACTIVATION: A NOVEL ASPECT OF ANGIOGENESIS IN ATHEROSCLEROSISHutterRandolph Hutter, M.D., The Cardiovascular Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA

Background: Neovascularization has been linked to the progression and vulnerability of atherosclerotic lesions. Angiogenesis is increased in lipid-rich plaque. Hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-1a) is a key transcriptional regulator responding to hypoxia and activating genes, which promote angiogenesis, among them vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). MORE»

IMPACT OF LIFE STYLE MODIFICATIONS, ANTIANGINALS, ANTIPLATELETS AND LIPID MODIFYING DRUGS AND OF CORONARY ARTERY REVASCULARIZATION ON MORTALITY AND MORBIDITY IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE: TRUTH AND FALSE NOTIONS Thadani
Udho Thadani, M.D., University of Oklahoma HSC and VA Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA

Stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) is a new term in vogue; and one must address not only the impact of treatment on symptoms and quality of life but also on mortality and other serious adverse cardiovascular outcomes (SACO) such as myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. Lifestyle alterations (abstinence of smoking, regular exercise and lipid modifying treatment with statins, reduce the incidence of SACO. MORE»

INTEGRATIVE THERAPY IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE: SAVIOR OR SHAM?
Schaefer
Saul Schaefer, M.D.
, University of California, Davis, CA, USA

While physicians generally treat cardiovascular disease and risk factors with conventional medications such as statins and beta blockers, patients often use complementary or integrative therapy such as fish oil, vitamins, enzymes, and chelation therapy. This $45 billion industry is based on the belief that non-allopathic therapies can lower cardiovascular risk in addition to, or in lieu of, conventional therapy. The NIH Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine supports therapy "for which there is some high-quality scientific evidence of safety and effectiveness"; MORE»

MEDICAL RISK FACTOR CONTROL IN LARGE TRIALS OF DIABETIC PATIENTS UNDERGOING CORONARY REVASCULARIZATION Farkouh
Michael E. Farkouh, M.D.
, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Over the past 2 decades, significant progress has been made in the medical management for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Despite guidelines that recommend specific targets for control of risk factors, specifically blood pressure targets in hypertensive patients, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) for those with hyperlipidemia, and glycemic control (HbA1C) in diabetic patients, current large cohort studies demonstrate that a significant proportion of patients do not achieve target risk factor control. MORE»

CHANGES IN HEART ALLOCATION FOR TRANSPLANTATION IN THE US AND WORLDWIDE: OPTIONS FOR A BETTER SOLUTION
Meyer
Dan M. Meyer, M.D.
, University of Texas Southwestern, Med Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX, USA

Objectives: To inform the transplant community of potential modifications in the heart allocation system. Background: Efforts to increase transplantation rates for candidates with highest waiting mortality and offer the greatest survival benefit due to transplantation remains the goal of our current systems. MORE»

SIMULTANEOUS HEART-KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATIONJohnson
Maryl R. Johnson, M.D.
, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA

Only around 70 heart-kidney transplants are performed worldwide annually, representing 2-3% of heart transplants and 0.5% of kidney transplants. However, due to the shortage of donor kidneys (in the United States over 95,000 people are waiting for a donor kidney and only 11,000 deceased donor kidney transplants are performed annually), it is important that all candidates receiving a heart-kidney transplant truly need the kidney. MORE»

ULTRAFILTRATION IN THE TREATMENT OF VOLUME OVERLOAD DUE TO HEART FAILUREElkayam
Uri Elkayam, M.D., University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Volume overload leading to both hemodynamic and symptomatic congestion is the cause for hospitalizations in the majority of cases with heart failure (HF). Ultrafiltration (UF) has been traditionally used for removal of volume in patients with diuretics resistance and those who need removal of a large volume. MORE»

USE OF NMR LDL LIPOPROTEIN PARTICLE ANALYSIS IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE PREVENTION
Kopecky

Stephen L. Kopecky, M.D.
, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA

Low density lipoprotein particle counts, assessed by NMR technology, is available and is a valuable adjunct to the standard lipid profile normally used in lipid management. This technology is most useful in the following 3 settings: MORE»

DEVICE CLOSURE OF ASD- LONG-TERM FOLLOW UP WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO COMPLICATIONS Sadiq
Masood Sadiq, M.D.
, The Childrens Hospital, Punjab Institute of Cardiology, Lahore, Pakistan

Device closure of ASD is now standard of treatment for suitable defects. There are however concerns over long-term outcome of device closure with special reference to complications mainly erosions and aortic regurgitation. The long term data is now available. MORE»

CORONARY ARTERY CALCIUM DENSITY AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE EVENTSCriqui
Michael H. Criqui, M.D.
, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA

Background: Coronary artery calcium (CAC) measured by computed tomography (CT) has strong predictive value for incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. The standard CAC score is the Agatston, which is weighted upward for greater calcium density. MORE»

IS THERE A PERFECT APPROACH FOR ABLATION PERSISTENT ATRIAL FIBRILLATION? Srivathsan
Komandoor Srivathsan, M.D.
, Mayo Clinic, AZ, USA

Ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation that remains symptomatic despite tolerated antiarrhythmic medication is widely utilized with reasonable success. However, ablative approach in persistent atrial fibrillation remains unclear. Pulmonary vein isolation remains the cornerstone but what additional procedures need to be done to enhance the poor success rate remains inconclusive. MORE»

ANY DEGREE OF MITRAL REGURGITATION FOUND DURING INVASIVE VENTRICULOGRAPHY IS ASSOCIATED WITH ALL CAUSE MORTALITYMovahed
Mohammad R. Movahed, M.D.
, PhD., Arizona, USA

Background: Using a large data base of patients who underwent coronary angiography for clinical reason, we evaluated association between reported degree of mitral regurgitation (MR) with all-cause mortality. MORE»


CATECHOLAMINERGIC POLYMORPHIC VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA: THE CLINICIAN'S PERSPECTIVE
LaPage
Martin J. LaPage, M.D.
, Michigan, USA

Catecholaminergic polymorphic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a potentially lethal, genetic channelopathy syndrome characterized by ventricular arrhythmias occurring primarily during exercise. Patients typically present with syncope or seizures and initial misdiagnosis is common because baseline cardiac testing is normal. MORE»

MICROBIOTA, SYSTEMIC INFLAMMATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR FUNCTION

Navab
Mohamad Navab, Ph.D.
, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, CA, USA

Inflammation contributes to different degrees to most if not all pathological conditions. The GI system including small intestine plays a major role in systemic inflammation and thus cardiovascular well being. MORE»

LEFT ATRIAL APPENDAGE CLOSURE Bertog
Stefan C. Bertog, M.D., CardioVascular Center, Frankfurt, Germany

Atrial fibrillation is a frequent cause of stroke. The mechanism in non-valvular atrial fibrillation is thrombus formation in the left atrium. Ninety percent of left atrial thrombi occur in the left atrial appendage. MORE»

HIGH SENSITIVITY TROPONINS: A STEP FORWARD OR AN UNREQUESTED COMPLICATION?Biasucci
Luigi M. Biasucci, M.D., Catholic University of the Sacred Heart Largo, Rome, Italy

Progressive improvement in the analytical sensitivity of troponin (cTn) assays has led to a more rapid diagnosis of AMI and improved risk stratification in patients with NSTE-ACS, several authors have found that hs-troponin allow a faster and more accurate diagnosis of myocardial infarction (AMI), allowing detection of almost all MI in the first 3 to 6 hours. MORE»


THORACOSCOPIC BIATRIAL MAZE PROCEDURE – A NOVEL MINIMAL-INVASIVE REMEDY WITH PROMISING MIDTERM RESULTS
Khoynezhad
Ali Khoynezhad, M.D., Ph.D.
, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Minimal Access atrial fibrillation has undergone significant progression in last few years. The lesion set has progressed from simple pulmonary vein (PV) isolation to a more comprehensive lesion set, which can be placed epicardially, and more closely replicates the left atrial lesions of the Cox maze III. Less-invasive access has progressed from bilateral mini thoracotomies initially described by Wolf and coworkers, to a totally thorascopic approach initially described by Puskas and coworkers. MORE»

USE OF AMBULATORY BLOOD PRESSURE MONITOR (ABPM) FOR GUIDING CARDIAC PATIENTS MANAGEMENT

Charuzi
Yzhar Charuzi, M.D.
, UCLA School of Medicine, CA, USA

24-hours ambulatory blood pressure monitoring has been for years a useful tool to assess variability in blood pressure beyond office checks or self-measurement. We decided to investigate the impact of ABPMs on patient management. The common indication for applying the test was uncertainty of BP fluctuations over a course of 24 hours. MORE»


SCREENING FOR ASYMPTOMATIC CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE: SEEKING VALUE IN A MULTI-MODALITY WORLD

Mahmarian
John J. Mahmarian, M.D., Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX, USA

There are multiple potential candidate testing modalities for evaluating patients at risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) which include stress ECG testing; stress echocardiography and myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI); and cardiac computed tomography (CT). Stress echocardiography and MPI are considered inappropriate in low and intermediate risk patients but may have value in patients at high CAD risk. MORE»

CVD IN WOMEN: A FRESH PERSPECTIVE

Kazory
Amir Kazory, M.D.
, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

While peritoneal dialysis is an established therapy for management of patients with end stage renal disease, it has also been proposed as a means of fluid and sodium extraction in patients with heart failure and volume overload. A number of studies have used this therapeutic modality in various settings and have generally reported positive results. MORE»


THE ROLE OF NITRIC OXIDE/PEROXYNITRITE IMBALANCE IN THE ISCHEMIC HEART

Malinski
Tadeusz Malinski, Ph.D.
, Ohio University, Ohio, USA

Background: The functional endothelial cells are the main source of nitric oxide (NO) in the heart. NO release in the beating heart is stimulated by mechanical forces during systole and diastole. NO release can be also stimulated in the heart by chemical pathways, i.e. epinephrine. MORE»


ANTICOAGULATION AND HEART VALVE DISEASE: IS IT TIME TO RECONSIDER WHO AND HOW?

Borer
Jeffrey S. Borer, M.D., New York, USA

Intra cardiac thrombosis and thromboembolism long have been associated with heart valve diseases (VHD). However, except when atrial fibrillation (AF) coincides with VHD, anticoagulation seldom is considered unless a valve has been replaced, particularly with a mechanical prosthesis. MORE»


BIVENTRICULAR PACING FOR ATRIOVENTRICULAR BLOCK AND SYSTOLIC DYSFUNCTION

Curtis
Anne B. Curtis, M.D., Buffalo, New York, USA

Background: Right ventricular pacing restores an adequate heart rate in patients with atrioventricular block, but high percentages of right ventricular apical pacing may promote left ventricular systolic dysfunction. We evaluated whether biventricular pacing might reduce mortality, morbidity, and adverse left ventricular remodeling in such patients. MORE»


REVERSAL OF CARDIAC REMODELING IN HEART FAILURE BY ALPHA-ADRENOCEPTOR BLOCKADE

Dhalla
Naranjan S. Dhalla, Ph.D, M.D., MB, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

In view of the role of elevated levels of circulating catecholamines, the activation of both alpha-adrenoceptor (AR) and beta-AR is considered to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Previous studies have shown the beneficial effects of beta-AR blockade in the failing heart; however, very little information on the action of alpha-AR blockade is available. MORE»


ALDOSTERONE - A BRIDGE BETWEEN CARDIOVASCULAR AND MOOD DISORDERS?

Jezova
Daniela Jezova, M.D.
, Institute of Experimental Endocrinology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovak Republic

Aldosterone is the main mineralocorticoid hormone involved in the control of blood volume. Its effects on water-electrolyte homeostasis have impact on the control of blood pressure and cardiovascular functions. It is well known that the comorbidity of cardiovascular and mental disorder is high, however, aldosterone has not been implicated in the psychopathology so far. MORE»


DUAL RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN-ALDOSTERONE SYSTEM INHIBITION: TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING?

Danser
A.H. Jan Danser
, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

The beneficial effects of ACE inhibitors (ACEi) and AT1 receptor blockers (ARBs) are due to blockade of tissue Ang II. Such blockade is often incomplete, due to activation of feedback mechanisms within the RAS (‘Ang II escape’). MORE»

SURGICAL TIMING FOR INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS

Kang
Duk-Hyun Kang, M.D., Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea

Despite advances in medical and surgical treatment, infective endocarditis (IE) remains a serious disease that carries considerable mortality and morbidity. The role of surgery has been expanding in IE and early surgery is strongly indicated for IE patients with congestive heart failure or uncontrolled infection, but no randomized trial has been conducted to clarify the indications and optimal timing of surgery because of ethical, logistical and financial constraints. MORE»

USE OF AMBULATORY BLOOD PRESSURE MONITOR (ABPM) FOR GUIDING CARDIAC PATIENTS MANAGEMENT

Charuzi
Yzhar Charuzi, M.D.
, UCLA School of Medicine, CA, USA

24-hours ambulatory blood pressure monitoring has been for years a useful tool to assess variability in blood pressure beyond office checks or self-measurement. We decided to investigate the impact of ABPMs on patient management. The common indication for applying the test was uncertainty of BP fluctuations over a course of 24 hours. MORE»


SCREENING FOR ASYMPTOMATIC CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE: SEEKING VALUE IN A MULTI-MODALITY WORLD

Mahmarian
John J. Mahmarian, M.D., Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX, USA

There are multiple potential candidate testing modalities for evaluating patients at risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) which include stress ECG testing; stress echocardiography and myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI); and cardiac computed tomography (CT). Stress echocardiography and MPI are considered inappropriate in low and intermediate risk patients but may have value in patients at high CAD risk. MORE»

 

 

  CARDIOLOGY ONLINE NEWS

The Cardiology Online Journal
 Editor: Asher Kimchi, MD

Distinguished Cardiologists and Scientists Honored with 2015 International Academy of Cardiology Awards at the 20th World Congress on Heart Disease, Vancouver, BC, Canada

2015 AwardsDr. Asher Kimchi, Founder and Chairman of the International Academy of Cardiology (IAC) today announced the winning recipients of the 2015 IAC Awards at the 20th World Congress on Heart Disease held in Vancouver, BC, Canada. In addition to the IAC awards, the committee also named three faculty to receive the Distinguished Fellowship Awards.

Dr. Asher Kimchi, together with Co-Chairmen Dr. John A. Elefteriades and Dr. Jeffrey S. Borer, headed a committee comprised of 226 of the world's leading cardiologists and scientists that reviewed a prestigious list of nominees and voted for their top choice.

The following awards for 2015 were presented at the Opening Ceremony of the International Academy of Cardiology Annual Scientific Sessions 2015, 20th World Congress on Heart Disease, to honor the memory of distinguished colleagues, all former members of the faculty of previous International Academy of Cardiology meetings who made major contributions to Medicine and Cardiology: MORE»

Dr. Nathan D. Wong to Deliver 9th HJC Swan Memorial Lecture at Opening of International Academy of Cardiology, Annual Scientific Sessions 2015, 20th World Congress on Heart Disease

Asher KimchiAsher Kimchi, M.D., Founder and Chairman of the International Academy of Cardiology, today announced that Nathan D. Wong, Ph.D., MPH, Professor and Director, Heart Disease Prevention Program, Division of Cardiology at the University of California, Irvine, California, USA, will deliver the ninth H.J.C. Swan Memorial Lecture at the Opening Ceremony of the International Academy of Cardiology, Annual Scientific Sessions 2015, 20th World Congress on Heart Disease, that will be held in Vancouver, BC, Canada, from Saturday, July 25 through Monday, July 27, 2015.

Nathan WongDr. Wong’s presentation, “State-Of-The-Art CVD Prevention: Looking Beyond and Interpreting the ACC/AHA Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Guidelines” will provide an overview and interpretation of key features of these important guidelines, including those on cardiovascular disease risk assessment, cholesterol management, lifestyle, and obesity, and will highlight recent research findings that help in the further understanding of these guidelines and their utility and implementation. With the foundation of preventive cardiology being the appropriate assessment of cardiovascular disease risk, and with recommendations for treatment intensity based on global cardiovascular risk, the guidelines on cardiovascular risk assessment provide an important starting point for consideration of treatment options. The large body of evidence that has accumulated on the use of imaging and biomarker tests also provides opportunity for further refinement of risk estimation.
MORE»


Click here to view Cardiology Online News articles on Opening Lectures.

Click here to view more Cardiology Online News articles on Opening Ceremony of the IAC Annual Scientific Sessions and presentation of the IAC Awards.

 

Invited Speaker Presentations at the IAC Annual Scientific Sessions 2015, 20th World Congress on Heart Disease, Vancvouer, BC, Canada
(click on the photo to view the video)
 



 
20th WORLD CONGRESS ON HEART DISEASE

EVOLUTION IN THE MANAGEMENT OF LOW RISK PATIENTS PRESENTING TO THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT WITH CHEST PAIN
Amsterdam
Ezra A. Amsterdam, M.D., University of California (Davis) Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, USA

The majority of patients presenting to the ED with chest pain comprise a low risk population who do not have acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or other life threatening condition. Therefore, most at are low risk for morbidity and mortality. Such low risk patients are usually identified by absence of a history of cardiovascular disease, normal or nonischemic ECG, normal initial troponin, and clinical stability. MORE»
 

THE ROLE OF PHARMACOLOGICAL THERAPY IN CHRONIC HEART VALVE DISEASES
Borer
Jeffrey S. Borer, M.D., SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn and New York, NY, USA

Valvular heart diseases (VHDs) are progressive. When they are “primary”, i.e., due to intrinsic abnormality of valve structure and not secondary to comorbid conditions (e.g., ischemia), they generally are characterized by long asymptomatic phases during which cardiac functional and hemodynamic debility progresses. Ultimately, these developments lead to symptoms, other morbidities and, finally, death. MORE»

 

 

THE 2014 AF GUIDELINES: WHAT'S NEW?
Cain
Michael E. Cain, M.D., University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA

The 2014 AHA/ACC/HRS Guidelines for the management of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) are derived from published clinical trials, basic science, and comprehensive review articles. They supersede the ACC/AHA/ESC 2006 Guidelines and two subsequent focused updates from 2011. Key new recommendations impacting patient care are: MORE»

 

MANAGEMENT OF ASYMPTOMATIC AORTIC STENOSIS: WHAT IS NEW IN 2015?
Chaliki
Hari P. Chaliki, M.D., Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ, USA

Calcific aortic stenosis is now the primary etiology of aortic stenosis in the majority of patients. Risk factors such as hyperlipidemia play an important role in the progression of aortic stenosis. According to the most recent ACC/AHA guidelines, peak velocity greater than 4 m/sec, or a mean gradient of more than 40 mmHg and a valve area of less than 1.0 cm2 is considered hemodynamically severe aortic stenosis. MORE»

 

EVOLVING UNDERSTANDING OF STRESS CARDIOMYOPATHY
Chokslingam
Anand Chockalingam, M.D., Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA

Stress cardiomyopathy (SC), also called Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, is increasingly diagnosed world over. ER physicians, Internists, Intensivists and anesthesiologists increasingly encounter SC patients presenting with angina, heart failure or arrhythmia. MORE»

 

 

LEFT VENTRICULAR REVERSE REMODELING WITH BIVENTRICULAR VERSUS RIGHT VENTRICULAR PACING IN PATIENTS WITH ATRIOVENTRICULAR BLOCK AND LEFT HEART FAILURE IN THE BLOCK HF TRIAL
Curtis
Anne Curtis, M.D., University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA

Background: In patients with heart failure (HF), biventricular pacing (BIV) attenuates adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling in addition to improving survival and relieving symptoms. However, little is known about the effects of BIV pacing in HF patients with atrioventricular (AV) block. MORE»

CO2-ENRICHED WATER BATH AS A NOVEL THERAPY FOR PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASE
Dhalla
Narajan Dhalla, Ph.D., M.D. Hon., ICS, St. Boniface Hospital Research, University of Manitoba, Canada

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a major health problem whereby narrowed arteries reduce blood flow to the ischemic limbs. We investigated the effects of CO2-enriched water bath (CEWB) therapy on blood flow in the ischemic hind limb. MORE»


WHOLE EXOME SEQUENCING FOR THORACIC AORTIC ANEURYSM: THE FUTURE IS HERE
Elefteriades
John A. Elefteriades, M.D., Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA

Background: Convincing evidence is accumulating that genetics play an important etiologic role in thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD). Multiple genes have been found to cause syndromic and familial TAAD. MORE»

A LARGE PRAGMATIC TRIAL OF STATINS IN PRIMARY PREVENTION: THE NEXT FRONTIER
Farkouh
Michael Farkouh, M.D., Cardiac Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

Atherothrombotic disease is the most common cause of death in the world. Pharmacologic LDL lowering has been shown to reduce coronary heart disease (CHD) events according to the LDL level achieved with no demonstrated level below which events do not decrease with additional LDL lowering. Further, available data suggest that the earlier the LDL lowering occurs, the greater the therapeutic effect of a given decrease. MORE»


C-REACTIVE PROTEIN MODULATION OF INFLAMMATION IN ACUTE CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE
Filep
Janos G. Filep, M.D., University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada

C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase reactant and an active regulator of innate immunity. Clinical studies have shown that elevated baseline serum CRP levels confer, albeit to varying degrees, additional prognostic value for future coronary artery disease (CAD) and death and may be useful for risk-guided therapy. CRP has been implicated in multiple aspects of atherogenesis and acute CAD; however, whether CRP plays a direct causal role in these events remains controversial. MORE»

THE SECRET SUPREMACY OF SMALL BLOOD VESSELS, AN ENDURING PUZZLE OF THE CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM: RESEARCH GAPS AND OPPORTUNITIES
Gallis
Zorina S. Gallis, Ph.D., National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA

Small blood vessels are a critical component of the vascular system and essential for the maintenance and proper functioning of organs throughout the body. Their malfunction is a major contributor to local and systemic diseases. MORE»


SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF DUAL MOTION ROTATIONAL CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY
Garcia
Joel A. Garcia, M.D., Orlando Health, Orlando, FL, USA

Background: Cardiac catheterization via standard angiography (SA) requires several angiograms while rotational coronary angiography (RA) employs the use of automated gantry acquisitions (LAO to RAO with a fixed cranial or caudal angulation) permitting complete visualization of the entire coronary tree via two injections of the left (LCA) (cranial and caudal) and one of the right coronary tree (RCA). MORE»

CARDIOPROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF THERAPEUTIC T3 TREATMENT IN MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION AND ISCHEMIA REPERFUSION
Gerdes
A. Martin Gerdes, Ph.D, Dept of Biomedical Sciences, New York Institute of Technology-College of Osteopathic Medicine, USA

Background: Myocardial Infarction (MI) leads to cardiac tissue hypothyroidism, a condition that by itself can lead to heart failure (HF). Potential improvements in LV remodeling and function with a therapeutic T3 dose after MI and ischemia/reperfusion (IR) are not clear. MORE»


WHAT DIABETES MELLITUS HAS TAUGHT US ABOUT POTENTIAL TREATMENTS FOR SMALL ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSMS
Gertz
S. David Gertz, M.D., Ph.D, The Hebrew University--Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel

Increased detection of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) at early stages of growth (more than 80% of those diagnosed now are less than 3.5 cm maximum diameter), and the high rate of severe complications of urgent, open abdomen or endovascular surgical treatment have emphasized the need for less invasive strategies that target the pathogenetic mechanisms of progression and rupture. MORE»

CARDIOVASCULAR RESPONSES TO THREATFUL CHALLENGES IN PERSONS WITH HIGH TRAIT ANXIETY
Jezova
Daniela Jezova, M.D., Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia

An optimal cardiovascular response to threatening challenges is indispensable for coping with the situation. Anxiety disorders and high anxiety as a personality trait have been expected to be associated with autonomic lability and hyperreactivity during stress. MORE»


ADVANCED IMAGING FOR STRUCTURAL HEART DISEASE INTERVENTIONS
Jilaihawi
Hasan Jilaihawi, M.D., Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA

MORE»

BEYOND THE GUIDELINES - NEW OPTIONS FOR TREATING HEART FAILURE IN 2015
Johnson
Maryl R. Johnson, M.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

The updated ACCF/AHA Guideline for the Management of Heart Failure is not even 2 years old, however, trials have suggested new potential treatment options for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Two of these trials will be reviewed. MORE»


ADJUDICATED VERSUS ADMINISTRATIVE HEART FAILURE WITH PRESERVED EJECTION FRACTION
Kalogeropoulos
Andreas Kalogeropoulos, M.D., Ph.D., Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA

Heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is associated with readmission and mortality rates similar to HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). No disease-modifying therapy for HFpEF exists to date, partially because of the multifactorial pathophysiology of HFpEF and the heterogeneity of patients. MORE»

POINT OF CARE ULTRASOUND, THE NEW PHYSICAL EXAMINATION
Kedan
Ilan Kedan, M.D., Cedars Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Background: Ultrasound technology has become a central part of modern day healthcare. Its use as a clinical tool will continue to expand as the technology becomes more portable. MORE»


HYBRID ATRIAL FIBRILLATION FOR ADVANCED ATRIAL FIBRILLATION
Khoynezhad
Ali Khoynezhad, M.D., Ph.D., Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia and is associated with a nearly five-fold increased risk for stroke as well as over two-fold increased risk of death. For symptomatic drug-refractory AF, percutaneous ablation has been used with good success in paroxysmal AF. MORE»

BODY MASS INDEX AND MORTALITY IN A VERY LARGE COHORT: IS IT REALLY HEALTHIER TO BE OVERWEIGHT?
Klatsky
Arthur L. Klatsky, M.D., Northern CA Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, Oakland, CA, USA

Purpose: To study risk of death in relation to body mass index (BMI) in 273,843 free-living persons. Background: Despite substantial published literature controversy persists about the optimal level of body weight. MORE»


AGING, ESTROGEN, CELL SENESCENCE AND VASCULAR INFLAMMATION
Knowlton
Anne Knowlton, M.D., University of California, Davis, CA, USA

Aging is characterized by the development of systemic inflammatory changes, organ dysfunction and frailty. In females, loss of estrogen compounds these changes. MORE»

CURRENT STATUS OF INTRAVASCULAR IMAGING
Koshy
Santhosh Koshy, M.D., University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, Tennessee, USA

Currently available intravascular imaging techniques that are used in clinical practice, have major limitations related to resolution and ease of imaging. There have been major innovations in the field of imaging to improve on these limitations and to incorporate novel imaging techniques that venture beyond the traditional delineation of anatomical intravascular structures. MORE»

ALTERED NUCLEAR AND CYTOSKELETAL MECHANICS IN CARDIAC MYOCYTES WITH D192G NUCLEAR LAMIN MUTATION
Long
Carlin S. Long, M.D., University of Colorado, Denver, CO, USA

Atomic force microscopy whole-cell loading/unloading curves were used to study the mechanical behavior of cardiomyocytes carrying the LMNA D192G mutation which is known to cause a severe form of dilated cardiomyopathy. MORE»

COLCHICINE AND NEW MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR ACUTE AND RECURRENT PERICARDITIS
Lopachuk
Gary D. Lopaschuk, Ph.D., University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

In heart failure, changes in cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolism contribute to this contractile dysfunction and to a decrease in cardiac efficiency. The failing heart has defects in energy metabolic processes that compromise ATP production necessary to maintain contractile function. MORE»


ATHEROSCLEROSIS, CANCER AND WOUND HEALING; THE SYSTEMS BIOLOGY CONNECTION
Lucas
Alexandra R. Lucas, M.D., Department Medicine, Division Cardiology, University of Florida, USA

Serpins have critical regulatory roles in coagulation, inflammatory, and apoptosis, representing a large percentage of circulating proteins. Genetic serpin mutations cause severe disorders such as deficiency in alpha1 antitrypsin and neuroserpin or in sepsis with disseminated intravascular coagulation. MORE»

NAVIGATING THE COMPLEXITIES OF APOPTOSIS AND AUTOPHAGY IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE: CAN WE CHART A CLEAR COURSE?
Maiese
Kenneth Maiese, M.D., University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ, USA

The programmed cell death pathways of apoptosis and autophagy play a significant role in the reparative and regenerative processes of the cardiovascular system. Apoptosis can control tissue development and remodeling during the early stages of development. MORE»


EARLY DIAGNOSIS OF THE CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM - THE NANOMEDICAL EVALUATION OF ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION
Malinski
Tadeusz Malinski, M.D., Rudek Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, USA

Background: Endothelial dysfunction can be directly related to the dysfunction of the cardiovascular system. The dysfunctional endothelium is characterized, among others, by the deficiency of bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) and excess production of cytotoxic superoxide (O2-) and peroxynitrite (ONOO-) – the main components of oxidative stress. MORE»

REOPERATIVE CARDIAC SURGERY IN ADULT CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE PATIENTS
Mora
Bassem N. Mora, M.D., Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA

Objectives: To discuss the spectrum of anomalies which require reoperative cardiac surgery in the adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patient. Background: There are >1,000,000 ACHD patients in North America. Cardiac surgery in those is divided into cases involving great complexity MORE»


NOVEL BIOMARKERS OF LIPID AND LIPOPROTEIN METABOLISM
Mora
Samia Mora, M.D., Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA

Objectives: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) can occur in individuals with low LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c). We investigated whether detailed measures of LDL subfractions and other lipoproteins can be used to assess CVD risk in a population with both low LDL-c and high C-reactive protein that was randomized to high-intensity statin or placebo. MORE»

THE ROLE OF MICRORNAS IN PERIPARTUM CARDIOMYOPATHY
Nair
Nandini Nair, M.D., Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center, Spokane, WA, USA

Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) causes considerable morbidity and mortality in young women during their reproductive years. The presentation is usually in the month preceding delivery up to 5 weeks post-partum. MORE»


REGULATION OF INTESTINAL GENES BY AN ORAL PEPTIDE REDUCES SYSTEMIC INFLAMMATION AND ATHEROGENESIS
Navab
Mohamad Navab, Ph.D., David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA

A high fat, high cholesterol diet (Western diet, WD) increases the levels of the potent growth promoter unsaturated lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in small intestine and plasma of LDLR-/- mice. Supplementing mouse chow with unsaturated LPA produced dyslipidemia and inflammation. WD increased the expression of the genes Acadl, Acot1 and Angptl4 while reducing that of Reg3g. MORE»



GENE-TARGETING OF NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE RECEPTOR-A ENHANCES THE EXPRESSION OF RAAS COMPONENTS LEADING TO INFLAMMATORY HYPERTENSIVE HEART DISEASE
Pandey
Kailesh N. Pandey, Ph.D., Tulane University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USA

Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was discovered over 30 years ago in the atrium of heart and has been extensively investigated with regard to physiology, pathophysiology, and cardiovascular disease therapeutics. MORE»

MISCONCEPTIONS AND DIAGNOSTIC CHALLENGES IN BIOPROSTHETIC VALVE THROMBOSIS
Pislaru
Sorin V. Pislaru, M.D., Ph.D., Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA

Bioprosthetic valve thrombosis (BPVT) is a rare, but potentially life-threatening complication. In a review of the Mayo Clinic experience we found that BPVT was systematically under-reported on TTE, and that most cases occurred late post-implantation. MORE»


EXERCISE ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY: ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES
Prokudina
Maria Prokudina, M.D., Ph.D., Federal North-West Medical Research Center, St. Petersburg, Russia

The presentation will describe the advantages and disadvantages of exercise echocardiography (Ex Echo) for evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD). Advantages and benefits of Ex Echo are the following: 1. Accuracy and availability; MORE»

TREATMENT OF OBSTRUCTIVE THROMBOSED PROSTHETIC HEART VALVE
Rahimtoola
Shabuddin H. Rahimtoola, M.D., University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA

A systematic review of the literature from 1996 -2012 revealed 9 studies with 48 patients with tricuspid OT PHV in whom thrombolytic therapy was successful in 88%. For left sided OT PHV, 17 studies comprising 756 patients had received thrombolytic therapy (TT) and in 13 studies comprising 662 patients had received surgical therapy (ST). MORE»


LIPID LOWERING IN PATIENTS WITH MILD AORTIC STENOSIS AND ELEVATED LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEIN: THE SEAS STUDY
Rajamannan
Nalini M. Rajamannan, M.D., Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA

Aims: To examine if pretreatment low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) levels and aortic stenosis (AS) severity alter the efficacy of lipid-lowering therapy in AS patients. Methods and Results: Asymptomatic patients with AS randomized (1:1) to 40 mg Simvastatin + 10 mg Ezetimibe combination vs. placebo and =2 echocardiograms in the SEAS trial. MORE»

DIAGNOSTIC TRICKS AND TIMELY TREATMENT OF AORTIC INTRAMURAL HEMATOMA
Reddy
Hanumanth K. Reddy, M.D., St. Louis University Medical School, St. Louis, MO, USA

Aortic intramural hematoma is a variant of acute aortic syndrome with a presentation similar to that of acute aortic dissection but difficult to make a timely diagnosis. This entity may be easily missed because of the absence of the intimal flap often seen in classical dissection. MORE»


RELAXIN, A POTENTIAL THERAPY FOR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION
Salama
Guy Salama, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Relaxin, a hormone of reproduction and has been identified as an insulin-like peptide with pleiotropic actions throughout the body including important cardiovascular actions. We recently demonstrated that Relaxin suppresses atrial fibrillation (AF) in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) hearts by remodeling the extracellular matrix, modulating cardiac ion channels and reducing cell hypertrophy. MORE»

PRO-INFLAMMATORY AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY MAST CELLS IN OBESITY AND DIABETES
Shi
Guo-Ping Shi, SC.D., D.SC., Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

Mast cells contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity and diabetes. Deficiency or pharmacological inactivation of mast cells protects mice from these metabolic diseases. This study demonstrates that leptin deficiency slants otherwise pro-inflammatory mast cells toward anti-inflammatory functions. MORE»


COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY: DIAGNOSTIC AND PROGNOSTIC VALUE
Sozzi
Fabiola B. Sozzi, M.D., Ph.D., Cardiology Unit, Policlinico Hospital, Milan, Italy

Coronary multislice computed tomography (CT) is increasingly being used as a tool for non-invasive visualization of the coronary arteries (1). The technique provides information on atherosclerotic plaque burden and to some extent on plaque composition. The diagnostic value of coronary CT scan is high. MORE»

CHOLESTEROL GOALS & TARGETS: SHOULD WE IMPROVE IT?
Sperling
Laurence Sperling, M.D., Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA

Appropriate intensity statins are recommended by the ACC/ AHA Blood Cholesterol Guidelines as first line lipid therapy for both high risk secondary prevention patients with established atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) and post-acute coronary syndrome (ACS). MORE»


VIEWING HEART FAILURE AS INTERSTITIAL CANCER: DIAGNOSTIC AND THERAPEUTIC AVENUES
Spinale
Frank Spinale, M.D., Ph.D., University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC, USA

In contrast to public perception, the morbidity and mortality as well as the resultant health care costs associated with chronic heart failure (HF) are increasing and arguably reaching epidemic proportions, but improvements in diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for this disease have not been forthcoming. MORE»

GI PROTEIN AS POTENTIAL TARGET FOR THE TREATMENT OF HYPERTENSION
Srivastava
Madhu B. Anand-Srivastava, Ph.D., Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada

Guanine nucleotide regulatory proteins (G proteins) play an important role in the regulation of a variety of physiological functions including blood pressure through the activation of different effectors. We have previously shown an overexpression of inhibitory G proteins (Gialpha proteins) in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and other models of hypertensive rats. MORE»


CARDIAC FIBROSIS IN HEART FAILURE
Taylor
Andrew J. Taylor, Ph.D., Alfred Hospital and Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Australia

Myocardial fibrosis is a fundamental event in the development of cardiac failure, and is a common feature in all patients with advanced cardiac failure regardless of the aetiology of cardiomyopathy. Increasing myocardial fibrosis results in progressive deterioration of myocardial function, with more extensive myocardial fibrosis identified histologically in the hearts of patients with advanced heart failure. MORE»

 

STRATEGIES FOR PREVENTION OF CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS IN PATIENTS WITH POLYVASCULAR DISEASE
Tomaru
Takanobu Tomaru, M.D., Toho University Sakura Hospital, Japan

Patients with severe carotid arterial sclerosis or those with polyvascular disease (PVD ) are at high risk for cardiovascular events. Ultra-sonography(US) is very useful for detection of PVD and we investigated usefulness of US and prognosis of patients with PVD or those with severe carotid arteriosclerosis. MORE»


UPDATE ON THE TREATMENT OF THE CHRONIC TOTAL OCCLUSION
Uretsky
Barry Uretsky, M.D., University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA

A key goal in treating obstructive coronary disease is complete revascularization (CR). Multiple observational and registry studies have suggested the value of CR in maximizing survival, minimizing long-term adverse cardiac events, and improving the quality of life. MORE»

 

 

SCREENING FOR CVD IN DIABETES: EVIDENCE AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Wong
Nathan D. Wong, Ph.D., University of California, Irvine, CA, USA

The ACC/AHA released evidence-based guidelines on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk assessment, lifestyle, obesity, and cholesterol management. The risk assessment guideline recommended a new “Pooled Cohort Equations” calculator to estimate 10-year and lifetime risk of atherosclerotic CVD (ASCVD), and other measures-- premature family history of CVD, C-reactive protein, ankle brachial index, and coronary calcium scores to further stratify risk and inform the treatment decision. MORE»


ZHANG’S PHENOMENON (HIS ELECTROGRAM ALTERNANS) AND A NEW MODEL OF ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE DUAL PATHWAY CONDUCTION
ZhangYouhua Zhang, M.D., Ph.D., New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine, NY, USA

Zhang’s phenomenon (originally His electrogram alternans), a new index of dual pathway atrioventricular (AV) node conduction, indicates that there are dual inputs rather than a final common pathway from the AV node into the His bundle. MORE»

 

 

Invited Speaker Presentations at the IAC Annual Scientific Sessions 2014, 19th World Congress on Heart Disease, Boston, MA, USA
(click on the photo to view the video)



 
19th WORLD CONGRESS ON HEART DISEASE

2014 UPDATE ON MANAGEMENT OF HYPERTENSION
Aronow
Wilbert S. Aronow, M.D., Westchester Medical Center/New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, USA

The American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association 2011 expert consensus document on hypertension in the elderly recommended the blood pressure (BP) in patients with primary hypertension or in patients at high risk for cardiovascular events such as those with coronary heart disease, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and heart failure be less than 140/90 mm Hg in adults with hypertension younger than 80 years and the systolic BP reduced to 140-145 mm Hg if tolerated in persons with hypertension aged 80 years and older. MORE»
 

PRESENT AND FUTURE OF NUCLEAR CARDIOLOGY AND CARDIAC CT IN CAD: VALUE-BASED IMAGING
Berman
Daniel S. Berman, M.D., Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA

The future use SPECT or PET, and cardiac CT will be based on their providing value by improving quality (e.g., reducing events) or decreasing costs. For prevention, coronary calcium scanning can provide value, guiding management more effectively than risk factors or other biomarkers. MORE»

 

 

GI PROTEINS, NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE RECEPTOR C AND REGULATION OF BLOOD PRESSURE
Anand-Srivastava
Madhu B. Anand-Srivastava, Ph.D., University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

C-ANP4-23, a ring deleted analog of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) that specifically interacts with natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPR-C) has been shown to decrease the enhanced expression of Gialpha proteins, implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension. MORE»

 

MANAGING ANGINA AND RISK VIA IMPROVED ENDOTHELIAL FUNCTION: THE EECP MODEL
Barsness
Gregory Barsness, M.D., Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA

Enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP) is an outpatient therapy for the treatment of stable ischemic heart disease, angina and heart failure. Although a non-invasive therapy, EECP treatment produces a marked acute hemodynamic effect similar to that produced by the invasive intra-aortic balloon pump. MORE»

 

TICAGRELOR LIMITS MYOCARDIAL INFARCT SIZE- AN ADENOSINE AND COX2 DEPENDENT EFFECT
Birnbaum
Yochai Birnbaum, M.D., Baylor College of Medicine, Texas, USA

In a phase III clinical trial (PLATO) Ticagrelor (TIC) showed better clinical outcomes than Clopidogrel (CLOP) in patients with acute coronary syndromes. In addition to P2Y12 receptor antagonism, TIC prevents cell uptake of adenosine and thus, may augment adenosine effects. MORE»

 

 

AORTIC REGURGITATION: IMPACT OF PREOPERATIVE SYMPTOMS FOR POST-VALVE REPLACEMENT SURVIVAL ON PROGNOSTICATION FROM MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTILITY
Borer
Jeffrey S. Borer, M.D., State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, New York, NY, USA

Both preoperative symptoms and severe preoperative myocardial contractility deficit predict survival among patients (pts) undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) for aortic regurgitation (AR). The interactive effects of these predictors are unknown. MORE»

SERENDIPITY IN MEDICINE; DOES CHANCE TRULY FAVOR THE PREPARED MIND?
Biederman
Robert W.W. Biederman, M.D. , Carnegie Mellon University, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Serendipity means a "fortuitous happenstance" or "pleasant surprise". It was first coined by Horace Walpole in 1754. In a letter he wrote to a friend Walpole explained an unexpected discovery he had made by reference to a Persian fairy tale, The Three Princes of Serendip. MORE»


SUCCESSFUL EVAR PROGRAM FOR AAA IN A RURAL HOSPITAL
Butman
Samuel M. Butman, M.D., Verde Valley Medical Center, Cottonwood, AZ, USA

Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is now widely accepted as the preferred method of mitigating the risk of rupture in patients with documented abdominal aneurysms. Beginning in higher volume centers, the procedure is now performed in smaller community hospitals. MORE»

PREDICTION OF ARRHYTHMIC EVENTS WITH POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY
Cain
Michael E. Cain, M.D., University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA

Between 184,000 and 462,000 Americans die suddenly each year. Fifty to seventy percent of these deaths are due to ventricular tachycardia/ fibrillation (VT/VF). We tested whether hibernating myocardium or myocardial sympathetic denervation identifies patients at high-risk for developing VT/VF independently of EF. MORE»


THE ROLE OF PROGENITOR CELLS IN ATHEROSCLEROSIS
Caplice
Noel M. Caplice, M.D., Ph.D., University College Cork, Cork. Ireland

We previously showed that circulating cells with smooth muscle outgrowth potential exist in the peripheral circulation and that bone marrow derived precursor cells contribute to smooth muscle cells within murine and human atherosclerotic plaque. More recently we have defined a myeloid subpopulation of cells that undergo smooth muscle cell differentiation following signalling through the CX3CR1 chemokine receptor. MORE»

LOW GRADIENT SEVERE AORTIC STENOSIS: DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT
Chaliki
Hari P. Chaliki, M.D., Mayo Clinic, Arizona, USA

According to the most recent American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, peak velocity greater than 4 m/sec, a mean gradient of more than 40 mmHg and a valve area of less than 1.0 cm2 is considered severe aortic stenosis (AS). Aortic valve surgery should be done promptly in symptomatic patients or patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) with severe AS because of a dismal prognosis without operation. MORE»


DUAL UTILIZATION OF EXERCISE ECHOCARDIOGRAMS AND MYOCARDIAL PERFUSION IN ASSESSING ISCHEMIA IN A CARDIOLOGY PRACTICE
Charuzi
Yzhar Charuzi, M.D., Cedars Sinai Heart Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA

In patients with suspected ischemia, the data derived from one type of imaging test may be insufficient to assess its significance. In 62 patients, two imaging techniques were utilized to assess the extent of ischemia and help determine clinical management. MORE»

CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS OF CRT AND ICD THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH HEART FAILURE BY RACE AND GENDER: FINDINGS FROM IMPROVE HF
Curtis
Anne B. Curtis, M.D., University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA

Background: Clinical trials have demonstrated benefit for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapies in patients with heart failure (HF) and reduced ejection fraction (EF), yet questions have been raised with regard to the benefit of device therapy for women and minorities. MORE»


DUAL AT1 RECEPTOR/NEPRILYSIN INHIBITION ('ARNI') IN HYPERTENSION: AN IMPROVEMENT VERSUS AT1 RECEPTOR BLOCKADE?
Danser
A.H. Jan Danser, M.D., Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Neprilysin inhibitors (NEPi) prevent natriuretic peptide breakdown, thereby promoting vasodilation and natriuresis. On the other hand, they increase angiotensin and endothelin-1 (ET-1). The combined NEP/ACE inhibitor omapatrilat displayed potent effects in hypertension and heart failure, but these were accompanied by the occurrence of angioedema due to bradykinin accumulation. MORE»

POTENTIAL THERAPY FOR THE PREVENTION OF SUDDEN CARDIAC DEATH
Dhalla
Naranjan S. Dhalla, Ph.D., M.D.(Hon), St. Boniface General Hospital Research Centre, University of Mantioba, Winnipeg, Canada

Objectives: Although sudden cardiac death is a leading cause of mortality, the mechanisms for its pathogenesis as well as therapy for prevention are poorly understood. Background: Since overactivation of sympathetic nervous system is invariably seen in subjects with high risk for sudden cardiac death, elevated levels of circulating catecholamine levels are considered to result in lethal ventricular arrhythmias and subsequent sudden cardiac death. MORE»


MITOCHONDRIAL DYSFUNCTION AND ARRHYTHMIC RISK: POSSIBLE NEW THERAPIES FOR SUDDEN DEATH
Dudley
Samuel C. Dudley, M.D., Ph.D., Brown University and Lifespan Cardiovascular Institute, Providence, RI, USA

Mitochondria are essential to providing ATP thereby satisfying the energy demand of the incessant electrical activity and contractile action of cardiac muscle. Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction can adversely affect cardiac electrical functioning by impairing the intracellular ion homeostasis and membrane excitability through reduced ATP production and excessive reactive oxidative species (ROS) generation, resulting in increased propensity to cardiac arrhythmias. MORE»

FUNCTIONAL AND ANATOMICAL CARDIAC IMAGING IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY ARTERY STENTS
Elhendy
Abdou Elhendy, M.D., Ph.D., Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, WI, USA

Coronary artery stenting has been shown to improve myocardial function, and ameliorate angina. The number of complex interventional procedures has recently increased due to technical advances. However, myocardial perfusion may be compromised after coronary stenting by acute thrombosis or the development of fibrointimal hyperplasia leading to decline in left ventricular function and increased risk of myocardial infarction. MORE»


REGRESSION OF HYPERTROPHY (AND FIBROSIS?) IN HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY
Fifer
Michael A. Fifer, M.D., Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA

Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and fibrosis are important determinants of morbidity and mortality in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Regression of hypertrophy remote from the interventricular septum is observed after septal reduction therapy with myectomy or alcohol ablation. MORE»

TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR 9 REGULATION OF COAGULATION IN ACUTE CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE
Filep
Janos G. Filep, M.D., Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Bacteriemia has recently been reported to be associated with increased risk of acute coronary artery disease and stroke. Bacterial DNA containing unmethyled CpG dinucleotide motifs is potent inducer of immune responses predominantly through Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). MORE»


A CASE OF ORTHOSTATIC HYPOTENSION AND RECENT ADVANCES
Fung
Gordon L. Fung, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., UCSF Medical Center at Mt. Zion, San Francisco, CA, USA

JM is a 78 year old man who had a history of hypertension and developed an ascending aortic aneurysm while under treatment. He presented to the hospital for elective prostate operation and was seen by Cardiology for evaluation of atypical chest pain. The patient gave a history of recurrent syncope over the past 6 years with syncope every 1-2 years. MORE»

MOLECULAR DRIVERS OF VASCULAR REMODELING
Galis
Zorina Galis, Ph.D., Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA

During their natural history, blood vessels undergo enduring, and sometimes irreversible structural changes in size and composition, a process commonly referred to as vascular remodeling. Many of these changes are initiated as a physiological response allowing adaptation and repair of the vessel wall, however inappropriate remodeling underlies the pathogenesis of major cardiovascular conditions, such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, or aneurysmal disease. MORE»


MANAGEMENT OF STABLE ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE: OVERVIEW OF RECENT GUIDELINES
Gardin
Julius M. Gardin, M.D., Hackensack University Medical Center, NJ, USA

Management guidelines regarding diagnosis and treatment of stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) have evolved with time. In 2012, the ACCF/AHA/ACP SIHD Guidelines (Fihn, Gardin, et al.) emphasized important concepts, e.g., the following: (1) Most SIHD patients should have a trial of guideline-directed medical therapy (GDMT), including risk factor modification, before considering revascularization to improve symptoms. MORE»

TRANSLATING T3 TREATMENT OF HEART FAILURE FROM BENCH TO BEDSIDE: FINALLY, A SAFE TREATMENT/MONITORING PROTOCOL THAT SHOULD WORK!
Gerdes
A. Martin Gerdes, Ph.D., New York Institute of Technology, Old Westbury, NY, USA

The idea of treating heart failure with thyroid hormones (THs) is not new. Unfortunately, cardiovascular clinical studies mostly using TH analogs at excessive doses demonstrated an increased incidence of arrhythmias and have largely deterred further studies. At the heart of the problem, no one has clearly demonstrated potential benefits using a therapeutic TH treatment/monitoring protocol that can be safely translated to humans. MORE»


CAN WE PREVENT HEART FAILURE READMISSIONS?
Heidenreich
Paul A. Heidenreich, M.D., Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA

Readmissions are common following an admission for heart failure occurring in 20-30% of patients within 30 days of discharge. Many payers including U.S. Medicare have estimated that a large fraction of these readmissions are preventable (up to 75%). MORE»

GUIDING PRINCIPLES IN STATIN UTILIZATION: EMERGING CLINICAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH CHALLENGES
Hennekens
Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., Dr.P.H., Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USA

The current totality of evidence on statins in treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) includes 170,000 secondary prevention and high risk primary prevention patients. Those assigned at random to a statin had statistically significant and clinically important reductions in myocardial infarction of 30%, stroke of 15%, the need for stents and coronary artery bypass grafts of 25% and coronary death of 22%. MORE»


SLEEP-TIME BLOOD PRESSURE AS A THERAPEUTIC TARGET FOR CARDIOVASCULAR RISK REDUCTION
Hermida
Ramon C. Hermida, Ph.D., Campus Universitario, Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain

Diagnosis of hypertension and clinical decisions regarding its treatment are typically based upon clinic blood pressure (BP) measurements, occasionally supplemented by wake-time patient self-assessment. Yet, correlation between BP level and target organ damage, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and long-term prognosis is greater for ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) than daytime in-clinic measurements. MORE»

COLCHICINE AND NEW MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR ACUTE AND RECURRENT PERICARDITIS
Imazio
Massimo Imazio, M.D., Maria Vittoria Hospital, Torino, Italy

Bacteriemia has recently been reported to be associated with increased risk of acute coronary artery disease and stroke. Bacterial DNA containing unmethyled CpG dinucleotide motifs is potent inducer of immune responses predominantly through Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). MORE»


A CASE OF ORTHOSTATIC HYPOTENSION AND RECENT ADVANCES
Jezova
Daniela Jezova, M.D., Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia

In comparison to coronary heart disease, the pathogenic mechanisms in stroke are very heterogeneous and reliable biomarkers to predict stroke severity and outcome are not available yet. The activation of neuroendocrine functions, particularly those involved in the stress response, represent important aspects of stroke pathophysiology. MORE»

COLCHICINE AND NEW MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR ACUTE AND RECURRENT PERICARDITIS
Jo
Hanjoong Jo, Ph.D., Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA

Atherosclerosis is the major underlying cause of myocardial infarction and stroke and preferentially occurs in arterial regions exposed to disturbed flow (d-flow) by mechanisms involving broad changes in gene expression. We have shown that D-flow rapidly induces atherosclerosis in vivo using a mouse partial carotid ligation model. MORE»


FRACTIONAL FLOW RESERVE (FFR) AT 2014- WHERE ARE WE AND WHERE IS IT GOING
Kaluski
Edo Kaluski, M.D., University Hospital, Newark, NJ, USA

New society guidelines support now the use of FFR over to assess intermediate stable native coronary lesions (now defined as 50-90% diameter stenosis when stress imaging is contraindicated, non-diagnostic, discordant or unavailable. MORE»

CARDIORENAL SYNDROME: NOT AS STRAIGHT FORWARD AS WE USED TO THINK
Kazory
Amir Kazory, M.D., University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Simultaneous dysfunction of the heart and the kidney represents a distinct spectrum of disease states composed of complex clinical scenarios with potentially adverse outcomes. Worsening renal function (WRF) in the setting of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) is one such clinical setup with not yet well-characterized underlying mechanisms. MORE»


THE EFFECT OF BENDAVIA ON ISCHEMIA/REPERFUSION INJURY, LEFT VENTRICULAR REMODELING AND DYSFUNCTION
Kloner
Robert A. Kloner, M.D., Ph.D., Good Samaritan Hospital/USC, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Background and Objectives: Bendavia is a small water soluble molecule that freely crosses cell membranes and localizes to the inner mitochondrial membrane where it associates with cardiolipin and reduces intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Our objective was to determine Bendavia’s effect on myocardial infarction. MORE»

INNATE IMMUNITY AND HEART DISEASE
Knowlton
Anne A. Knowlton, M.D., University of California, Davis, CA, USA

The innate immune system is a primitive, rapid immune response that responds to detected threats by producing a rapid inflammatory response. A series of pattern recognition receptors (PRR) recognizes molecular patterns (pathogen associated molecular patterns or PAMPs) that are common to microbes and to danger signals (damage-associated molecular patterns or DAMPs) from injured cells. MORE»


NON PHARMACOLOGICAL AND CATHETER BASED THERAPY OF DIFFICULT TO TREAT (D2T) HYPERTENSION
Koshy
Santhosh K. Koshy, M.D., UT Health Sciences Center, Memphis, TN, USA

Resistant or difficult to treat hypertension is not uncommon and is a nightmare for both primary care physicians and specialists. It is defined as an uncontrolled hypertension with blood pressure consistently above 140/90mmHg despite adequate regimen with four or more anti-hypertensives, preferably with one that includes a diuretic. MORE»

PCI VERSUS CABG IN MULTIPLE VESSEL CAD
Kumar
Adarsh Kumar, M.D., Govt Medical College/GND Hospital, Amritsar, India

CAD is number one killer in the world. CABG and PCI are both safe and established invasive treatment modalities for CAD. However conflicting information exists when comparing their long term efficacy in multiple vessel disease (MVD). MORE»


METABOLIC SYNDROME CRITERIA: CAUSE VERSUS EFFECT OF CARDIOMETABOLIC DISEASE
Levine
T. Barry Levine, M.D., Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Although metabolic syndrome (MetSyn)-criteria provide a convenient tool to recognize individuals at increased cardiometabolic disease-risk, they appear haphazard, mixing descriptors of body-phenotype with lab-tests and a vascular condition. Are MetSyn-criteria causes or effects? MORE»

MITOCHONDRIAL DYSFUNCTION AND DIABETIC HEART DISEASE
Liang
Qiangrong Liang, M.D., Ph.D., New York Institute of Technology, Old Westbury, NY, USA

Most diabetic patients die from heart disease or stroke, highlighting the importance of understanding and treating cardiovascular complications of diabetes. A large body of evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction and increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critical to diabetic heart damage. MORE»


CARBON NANOTUBES SCAFFOLDS AS A NEW BASIS FOR CARDIAC TISSUE ENGINEERING
Long
Carlin S. Long, M.D., University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO, USA

In our previously published work we reported that MWCNTs used as growth supports for culturing neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM) increase myocyte proliferation and induce a more negative resting potential, suggesting that carbon nanotubes promote cardiomyocyte maturation. However, the mechanistic link between the enhanced cardiomyocyte proliferation and maturation and carbon nanotubes interaction was unknown. MORE»

USE OF FRACTION FLOW RESERVE TO PREDICT CHANGES OVER TIME IN MANAGEMENT OF SUPERFICIAL FEMORAL ARTERY
Lotfi
Amir S. Lotfi, M.D., Tufts University School of Medicine, Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, MA, USA

Background: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a condition characterized by progressive narrowing of the arteries in the peripheral vascular bed which affect patient quality of life. The purposes of this study were to 1) establish the feasibility of performing peripheral FFR (pFFR) in the peripheral vascular circulation, 2) correlate post intervention pFFR with future restenosis, and 3) demonstrate an association between pFFR and peak systolic velocity measured by duplex ultrasound. MORE»


TRIGGERS OF ACUTE CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS: CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS
Madjid
Mohammad Madjid, M.D., Texas Heart Institute, Houston, TX, USA

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular events result from two separate phases of mechanistic processes. Whereas lipid accumulation and chronic latent inflammation lead to development of atherosclerotic plaques over a period of years, certain internal or external factors can “trigger” the transformation of stable plaques into unstable plaques within hours to weeks, causing an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). MORE»

STRESS-ONLY IMAGING; A NEW PARADIGM FOR PERFORMING STRESS MYOCARDIAL PERFUSION IMAGING
Mahmarian
John J. Mahmarian, M.D., Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, Houston, Texas, USA

Background: There have been continued efforts over the past several years to utilize a patient-centered imaging approach when performing stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). One such approach has been to choose a single day stress/rest imaging strategy so that if the stress study is normal, rest imaging is unnecessary. MORE»


PRECISION MEDICINE FOR TODAY AND TOMORROW: TARGETING MOLECULAR PATHWAYS FOR VASCULAR DISEASE
Maiese
Kenneth Maiese, M.D., University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ, USA

Molecular targeting is becoming increasing recognized as a necessary means for drug development and the successful treatment of an individual’s disease onset and progression. Although multiple pathways can be responsible for cardiac or vascular disorders in patients, kinase pathways in the vascular system that involve phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K), protein kinase B (Akt), and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) offer especially exciting prospects for developing strategies for disease in the cardiovascular system. MORE»

WOMEN AND HEART DISEASE: UPDATE ON PREVENTION
Malik
Shaista Malik, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., University of California, Irvine, CA, USA

Cardiovascular disease remains the leading killer of both men and women in the United States. However, compared to men, women have higher rates of morbidity and mortality secondary to cardiovascular disease. MORE»


THE PIVOTAL ROLE OF L-ARGININE IN THE ISCHEMIC HEART PRECONDITIONING - A NANOMEDICAL APPROACH
Malinski
Tadeusz Malinski, Ph.D., Dr.h.c.m., Ohio University, Athens, OH, USA

Ischemic preconditioning with a short coronary artery occlusion has been shown to protect the heart against a subsequent myocardial infarction. Although several endogenous molecules have been implicated in the heart adaptation to an ischemic event, its mechanism is not well understood. A nanomedical approach was used to study, in vivo and ex vivo, the concentration changes of small molecules in the heart during preconditioning. MORE»

TEMPORAL VARIATION IN ACUTE AORTIC DISEASES: ONLY A RANDOM PHENOMENON?
Manfredini
Roberto Manfredini, M.D., University of Ferrara, Italy

Chronobiology is a branch of biomedical sciences devoted to the study of biological rhythms, that according to cycle length, are classified into: circadian (period of around 24 hours), ultradian (less than 24 hours), and infradian (more than 24 hours, e.g., days, weeks, months), and their interactions with bodily functions. MORE»


DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGES IN CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE IN THE XXI CENTURY: IMPACT IN MANAGEMENT AND OUTCOMES
Marelli
A.J. Marelli, M.D., M.P.H., Mc Gill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada

The field of complex congenital heart disease (CHD) has evolved greatly, allowing for more patients to survive into adulthood. Emerging is a new era of changing demographics that must be matched with services and infrastructures commensurate with its growth. MORE»

 

TRAINING OF CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSICIAN-SCIENTISTS: RESULTS OF SPECIFIC TRAINING PATHWAYS
Marsh
James D. Marsh, M.D. , University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA

Physician-scientists play a crucial role in biomedical research in the United States. However, the number and portion of MD’s who commit a major portion of their professional time to research and who receive major external funding is diminishing. MORE»


PREVENTION OF STROKE IN ATRIAL FIBRILLATION: ARE ALL ORAL DRUGS THE SAME?
Martinez Rubio
Antoni Martinez-Rubio, M.D., Ph.D., University Hospital of Sabadell (Univ Autonoma de Barcelona), Sabadell, Spain

Prevention of thromboembolic events using oral anticoagulant drugs (OAC) is mandatory in several patients with atrial fibrillation. Therefore, OAC have been developed and used since decades. However, efficacy of these must be well balanced with the risk of inherent bleeding complications. MORE»

 

SATURATED FAT INTAKE AND THE GENESIS OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE – WHERE’S THE EVIDENCE?
Mehta
Jawahar L. Mehta, M.D., Ph.D. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA

Dietary saturated fat intake has long been blamed for causing coronary artery disease based on scant epidemiological data. However, little evidence supports the notion that reducing saturated fat intake would reduce coronary artery disease. MORE»


STEM CELL AND GENE THERAPY FOR HEART FAILURE
Miller
Leslie W. Miller, M.D., University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA

The number of patients with advanced heart failure who are still symptomatic despite optimized medical therapy continues to increase. Therapeutic options for this population have been limited to heart transplant or use of LVADs. MORE»

 

 

INTEGRATIVE AND COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE IN CARDIOLOGY: NEW HOPE OR JUST HIP AND HYPE?
Mody
Freny V. Mody, M.D., VA Greater Los Angeles HCS, CA, USA

Objectives: To review rigorous scientific evidence of benefit and effective treatments in integrative medicine (IM) for cardiovascular disease (CVD). IM integrates traditional medicine with non-conventional therapeutic modalities referred to as complementary alternative medicine (CAM). MORE»


CARDIAC SURGERY IN THE ADULT CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE PATIENT: A SPECTRUM OF LESIONS
MoraBassem N. Mora, M.D., Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Cleveland Clinic, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Objectives: To discuss the spectrum of anomalies which require cardiac surgery in the adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patient. Background: There are >1,000,000 ACHD patients in North America. Cardiac surgery in those is divided into three categories MORE»

 

RESIDUAL VASCULAR RISK AFTER STATIN THERAPY: THE PROMISE OF NOVEL LIPOPROTEIN BIOMARKERS
Mora
Samia Mora, M.D., M.H.S., Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

Objectives: Statins are the most widely used lipid-lowering agents and the standard of care for individuals with dyslipidemia, prior CVD, or at high-risk for CVD. However, the risk among statin-treated individuals remains high and has been termed “residual risk”. MORE»


INDOXYL SULFATE AND CARDIO-RENAL SYNDROME; THE ROLE OF ARYL HYDROCARBON RECEPTOR
MoritaToshisuke Morita, M.D., Ph.D., Toho University Omori Medical Center, Ota-ku, Tokyo, Japan

The aim of this lecture is to discuss research involving the ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and their role in cardio-renal syndrome. AhR is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor/transcription factor belonging to the basic helix-loop-helix/per-AhR nuclear translocator-Sim family of proteins. MORE»

 

UPDATE ON CORONARY BIFURCATION CLASSIFICATION AND TECHNIQUES
Movahed
Mohammad R. Movahed, M.D., Ph.D., The Southern Arizona VA Health Care System, Tucson, AZ, USA

There are many classifications for coronary bifurcation lesions. This talk will focus on most comprehensive classification of bifurcation lesions that is simple, practical and inclusive of other important features of coronary bifurcation lesions that are not mentioned in other classifications. MORE»


MECHANISMS OF HYPERTROPHY IN VALVULAR HEART DISEASE
OlsenNiels T. Olsen, M.D., Ph.D., Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark

Myocardial hypertrophy has a prominent role in valvular heart disease. The evaluation of hypertrophy is invaluable when determining the hemodynamic significance of a valve lesion, as the myocardium responds to increased load from regurgitant or stenotic valve lesions with growth in predictable patterns. MORE»

 

MEDITERRANEAN DIET AND SECONDARY PREVENTION OF CVD
Panagiotakos
Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos, Ph.D., Harokopio University, Athens, Greece

Adherence to a healthy dietary pattern, such as the Mediterranean diet, exerts a beneficial role regarding the development of coronary heart disease. In addition, several studies support the protective role of the Mediterranean diet as far as secondary prevention of CVD is concerned.MORE»


GENETIC DISRUPTION OF NPR1 UPREGULATES CARDIAC EXPRESSION OF PROINFLAMMATORY MEDIATORS
PandeyKailash N. Pandey, Ph.D. Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA

Proinflammatory cytokines play a central role in the pathophysiology and development of endothelial dysfunction, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure in experimental animal models and humans. MORE»

 

MANAGEMENT OF ATRIAL FLUTTER
Paydak
Hakan Paydak, M.D., University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA

Atrial flutter affects nearly 1 million people in the United States, particularly the older age group and men. It is frequently seen in patients with heart failure, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, COPD and in postoperative states. MORE»


HAND HELD CARDIAC ULTRASOUND: ROLE IN CLINICAL PRACTICE
PellikkaPatricia A. Pellikka, M.D., Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN, USA

Technologic advances have resulted in miniaturization of ultrasound systems. Battery-operated, hand-held cardiac ultrasound devices (HHCU) devices weigh less than one pound, fit into the pocket of a laboratory coat, and have been approved by the FDA for cardiac imaging. MORE»

 

LEFT VENTRICULAR FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC TOTAL OCCULSION OF LAD: LONG-TERM FOLLOW-UP
Prokudina
Maria Prokudina, M.D., Ph.D., Federal Center of Heart, Blood and Endocrinology, St. Petersburg, Russia

Background: There is no agreement regarding the revascularization of patients with chronic total occlusions (CTO) of left descending artery (LAD) and signs of ischemia. One of the treatment goals is improvement of left ventricle (LV) function. MORE»


MECHANISMS OF HYPERTROPHY IN VALVULAR HEART DISEASE
OlsenNiels T. Olsen, M.D., Ph.D., Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark

Myocardial hypertrophy has a prominent role in valvular heart disease. The evaluation of hypertrophy is invaluable when determining the hemodynamic significance of a valve lesion, as the myocardium responds to increased load from regurgitant or stenotic valve lesions with growth in predictable patterns. MORE»

 

Invited Speaker Presentations at the IAC Annual Scientific Sessions 2013, 18th World Congress on Heart Disease, Vancouver, BC, Canada
(click on the photo to view the video)


 
18th WORLD CONGRESS ON HEART DISEASE

INFLAMMATION - THE NEW TARGET FOR PREVENTION OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE
Roberts Robert Roberts, M.D., University of Ottawa Heart Institute, ON, Canada

New Technology that evolved in 2005 made it possible to genotype the whole human genome sequence utilizing a million DNA markers in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This led to the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) in pursuit of the genes for coronary artery disease (CAD). MORE» 

PRACTICAL GENETICS OF THORACIC AORTIC ANEURYSM
Elefteriades
John A. Elefteriades, M.D.
, Aortic Institute at Yale-New Haven, CT, USA

The discovery of the genetics of thoracic aortic aneurysm dates back to observations by Hippocrates in 400 BC. The contributions of Marfan, Ehler, and Danlos are well-appreciated. Another germinal advance was the recognition in 1981 by M. David Tilson at Yale that abdominal aortic aneurysm runs in families. MORE»

SEX DIFFERENCES IN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE
Regitz_Zagrosek Vera Regitz-Zagrosek, M.D., Center for Cardiovascular Research, Berlin, Germany

Sex differences affect the presentation, treatment results, and outcomes of cardiovascular diseases. Men suffer at younger ages than women from coronary artery disease and hypertension and more commonly develop systolic heart failure or aortic aneurysms. Women are more frequently affected by heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, long QT-syndromes and Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy. MORE»  

CPT1b DEFICIENCY IS BAD FOR THE HYPERTROPHIED HEART
Yang
Qinglin Yang, M.D.
, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, USA

Objective: To investigate the effect of Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b (CPT1b) deficiency on pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Background: CPT1 is a rate-limiting step of mitochondrial ß-oxidation by controlling the mitochondrial uptake of long-chain acyl-CoAs. MORE»

IS DIABETES REALLY A CORONARY HEART DISEASE RISK EQUIVALENT?
Wong Nathan D. Wong, Ph.D., University of California, Irvine, CA, USA

Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is associated with substantial increases in morbidity and mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD) and has been considered a CHD risk equivalent by the US National Cholesterol Education Program. The East-West Study originally showed persons with diabetes but no prior myocardial infarction had a similar risk of future CHD events as those with a prior myocardial infarction and no diabetes. MORE»

INTERACTION OF GENE AND SALT DIETS ON CARDIAC ANGIOTENSIN II, ALDOSTERONE, AND CYTOKINES IN HYPERTROPHIED HEART
Pandey
Kailash N. Pandey, Ph.D.
, Tulane University School of Medicine, LA, USA

The objective of the present study was to elucidate the interactive roles of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) gene (Npr1) and salt diets on cardiac angiotensin II (ANG II), aldosterone (ALDO), and pro-inflammatory cytokines in hypertrophied hearts. Npr1 genotypes included gene-disrupted heterozygous (+/-; 1-copy), wild-type (+/+; 2-copy), gene-duplicated heterozygous (++/+; 3-copy), and gene-duplicated homozygous (++/++; 4-copy) mice. Animals were fed with low, normal, and high salt-diets. MORE»

PERSONALIZED MEDICINE IN DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY
Mestroni Luisa Mestroni, M.D., University of Colorado, CO, USA

Clinical genetic testing is becoming more mainstream in inherited disorders, such as cardiomyopathies. At the same time, newer DNA sequencing technology can now complete the sequencing of an entire human genome several times over in a matter of days, in an efficient and cost effective manner. However, the extent of remarkable genetic variation is increasingly being appreciated and this undoubtedly adds new challenges to the difficulty of distinguishing true pathogenetic variants from benign variants in diagnostic genetics and in the research setting. MORE»

MITOCHONDRIAL FISSION AND FUSION IN HEART FAILURE
Knowlton
Anne A. Knowlton, M.D.
, University of California, Davis, CA, USA

Mitochondrial fusion and fission are essential processes for preservation of normal mitochondrial function. OPA1, a mitochondrial fusion protein, is decreased in both human and rat failing hearts. A number of inherited neuropathies are associated with mutation of fission/fusion proteins, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. MORE»

NEW INSIGHT INTO TREATMENT OF AORTIC STENOSIS: LIGHT AT THE END OF THE TUNNEL
Heistad Donald D. Heistad, M.D., University of Iowa, IA, USA

No medical therapy for fibro-calcific aortic valve stenosis (FCAVS) is effective. We have developed experimental models of severe FCAVS in mice, and are using these models to examine interventions that may be useful in slowing the development or progression of FCAVS. MORE»

CAROTID ULTRASOUND EVALUATION OF SUBCLINICAL ATHEROSCLEROSIS IN 2013: PROGRESS AND PITFALLSGardin Julius M. Gardin, M.D., Hackensack University Medical Center, NJ, USA

Carotid artery ultrasound intima-medial thickness (IMT) measurements are reported to add predictive value to traditional risk factors for predicting myocardial infarction and stroke. Recently, we reported that the Lifetime Risk algorithm was superior to both 10-year and 30-year Framingham Risk Score (FRS) algorithms in assigning subjects with carotid or femoral plaques to the high-risk FRS category for women aged 20-to-60 years and for men aged =50 years. MORE»

PREVENTION OF REPERFUSION INJURY IN PATIENTS WITH ST ELEVATION MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION: THE CGMP PATHWAY
Garcia-Dorado David Garcia-Dorado, M.D., Ph.D., Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain

Despite standard-of-the-art reperfusión therapy, most patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) present significant myocardial necrosis, and many of them experience adverse left ventricular remodeling and adverse outcomes. Coadjuvant therapies able to limit necrosis in these patients by reducing reperfusion injury are thus of great potential clinical interest. MORE»

IMPACT OF DENERVATED MYOCARDIUM ON IMPROVING RISK STRATIFICATION FOR SUDDEN CARDIAC DEATH
Cain
Michael E. Cain, M.D.
, University at Buffalo, NY, USA

The annual incidence of sudden cardiac death in the United States is between 184,000 and 462,000, with estimates that 50% to 70% of the deaths are due to VT or VF. Availability of therapies shown to reduce death in various at-risk groups, including beta-blockers, ACE- inhibitors, statins, aldosterone blockers, and the implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD), underscore the need to accurately identify patients who will develop VT/VF and exclude those who will not. MORE»

DIHYDROFOLATE REDUCTASE IN CARDIOVASCULAR PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
(click on the photo to view the video)

Garcia-Dorado Linda Cai, M.D., Ph.D., UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, CA, USA

It has become clear during the past decade that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) can transform into a superoxide-generating/pro-oxidant enzyme, when its essential cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (H4B) becomes deficient. This phenomenon is now referred to as eNOS uncoupling. MORE» 

NOVEL USES OF CARDIAC MRI FOR NON-ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE
Biederman Robert W. W. Biederman, M.D., Carnegie Mellon University, PA, USA

While the evaluation of ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICMX) has been well defined via Cardiovascular MRI (CMR), less is understood how the application of similar approaches can be incorporated for the identification non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICMX), often defining many obscure diagnoses. The utility for accurate, rapid, inexpensive and robust technique not requiring biopsy confirmation has particular value in the armamentarium of informed clinicians. MORE»

ENHANCING GLUCOSE OXIDATION AS AN APPROACH TO TREAT 403 HEART FAILURE
Lopaschuk
Gary Lopaschuk, Ph.D., University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada

Alterations in cardiac energy metabolism contribute to the impaired heart function observed in heart failure patients. The failing heart is both energy compromised, as well as inefficient at producing energy. MORE»

THE HIGH CORONARY DISEASE RISK OF SOUTH ASIAN AMERICANS
Klatsky
Arthur L. Klatsky, M.D., Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Oakland, CA, USA

Objective and Background: Prevalence data and case-control studies suggest high coronary artery disease (CAD) risk in South Asians (SA) but prospective studies remain sparse. We performed a comprehensive prospective analysis in a large population. MORE»

LOW INCOME IS AN INDEPENDENT PREDICTOR OF IN-HOSPITAL MORTALITY AMONG HEART TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS: A NATIONWIDE INPATIENT SAMPLE STUDY

Aronow
Wilbert S. Aronow, M.D.
, New York Medical College, NY, U.S.A.

Lower socio-economic condition has been shown to have greater risk of rejection and graft loss among heart transplant recipients who survive the transplant hospitalization. However, the association of income status and in-hospital outcomes among heart transplant recipients have not been studied from a national database. MORE»

CVD IN WOMEN: A FRESH PERSPECTIVE

Amsterdam
Ezra A. Amsterdam, M.D.
, University of California, Davis, CA, USA

Recognition that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in women has stimulated major interest and improvement in the detection, prevention, and treatment of CVD in women. Certain aspects of this subject require further clarification and will be considered in this presentation. MORE»

USEFULNESS OF OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY IN DAILY CLINICAL PRACTICE

Akasaka
Takashi Akasaka, M.D., Ph.D.
, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan

Recently developed frequency-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) allow us to obtain 75mm length of high resolution intravascular image (10-20 micrometer) within 3 sec during contrast injection through a guiding catheter. This FD-OCT demonstrates the pathophysiology of the coronary atherosclerosis including vulnerable plaques with thin cap fibroatheroma (TCFA) in vivo before percutaneous intervention (PCI). MORE»

NEW STRATEGIES FOR ACUTE STROKE INTERVENTION

Sievert
Horst Sievert, M.D., CardioVascular Center Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany

Stroke is the third leading cause of death and leading cause of disability in western countries. Though progress has been made in acute stroke intervention with the use of intravenous thrombolytic therapy, a large number of patients remain significantly disabled despite thrombolysis. MORE»

OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY (OCT): WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Garcia
Joel A. Garcia, M.D., Denver Health Medical Center (DHMC) and University of Colorado Hospital at Denver, Denver, CO, USA

Objectives: Understanding the technical aspects of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) as they apply to daily clinical practice and comparing OCT images and acquisitions to intra-vascular ultrasound (IVUS). MORE»

THE COMPLICATED STEMI: WHAT TO DO WITH MULTIVESSEL DISEASE

Barsness
Gregory W. Barsness, M.D., Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA

Primary PCI is the treatment of choice for the majority of patients presenting with myocardial infarction. In many instances, the choice of revascularization strategy is complicated by the presence of multivessel disease, especially in the presence of additional comorbidities, chronic total occlusions and, infrequently, hemodynamic or electrical instability. MORE»

PTEN AND STATINS INDUCED NEW ONSET DIABETES

Birnbaum
Yochai Birnbaum, M.D., Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA

Background: High-dose statin therapy increases the incidence of new-onset diabetes. Studies in animal models have suggested that prolonged statin therapy upregulates Phosphatase and Tensin Homologue on Chromosome 10 (PTEN) expression. PTEN levels are also elevated in the heart, aorta and skeletal muscles of animals with diabetes, as well as the myocardium of diabetic patients. MORE»

MAJOR NON-CARDIAC SURGERY IN PATIENTS WITH AORTIC STENOSIS - SAME AS 20 YEARS AGO?

Pislaru
Sorin Pislaru, M.D., Ph.D., Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA

Severe aortic stenosis has been long recognized as a risk factor for perioperative mortality and morbidity. Current ACC/AHA Guidelines recommend that elective noncardiac surgery be postponed for AS patients until after aortic valve surgery, due to an estimated mortality risk of noncardiac surgery at approximately 10%. MORE»

FAILURE TO OVEREXPRESS UROCORTIN FOLLOWING CARDIOPLEGIC ARREST MAKES THE HEART OF DIABETIC PATIENTS UNDERGOING ON-PUMP CORONARY ARTERY BYPASS GRAFTING MORE SUSCEPTIBLE TO APOPTOSIS AND CARDIAC DYSFUNCTION

Scarabelli
Tiziano M. Scarabelli, M.D., St John Hospital & Medical Center/Wayne State University SOM, Detroit, MI, USA

Background. Molecular mechanisms responsible for the reported worse outcome of diabetic patients (DMP) after on-pump cardiac surgery (OPCS) remain unknown. Opposite effects have been reported for Urocortin (Ucn)/PKCe and PKCd, the former being cardio-protective and the latter pro-apoptotic. MORE»

BEYOND HDL CHOLESTEROL: WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM HDL PARTICLE NUMBER AND SIZE?

Mora
Samia Mora, M.D., Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA

Given the consistent inverse association of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) with cardiovascular disease (CVD), there is immense interest in developing therapies that raise HDL-C. But HDL-C, the cholesterol carried by HDL particles, may not fully capture HDL-related cardioprotection. MORE»

THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN DEPRESSION AND DIABETES

Barrett-Connor
Elizabeth Barrett-Connor, M.D., UCSD Dept. of Family and Preventive Medicine, La Jolla, CA, USA

Depression increases the risk of mortality, shown in a 12-year follow-up of 10,025 U.S. NHANES adults (Egede LE, Diabetes Care, 2005). Because both diabetes and depression are common, there is considerable overlap by chance alone; a diagnosis of both is most likely to be made in hospitalized patients (Berkson’s bias). MORE»

CALIFORNIA REVASCULARIZATION: PCI OUTCOMES IN THE SUNSHINE STATE

Bommer
William J. Bommer, M.D., University of California Davis, Medical Center, Davis, CA, USA

Introduction: In California (CA), 141 hospitals perform percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with 122 hospitals reporting to the NCDR® CathPCI registry. Objective: To evaluate the PCI volume and composite event outcomes in hospitals with surgery On-site versus hospitals with surgery Off-site in CA. MORE»

HDL AND THE ATHEROSCLEROSIS - MYTH OR REALITY

Rosenson
Robert S. Rosenson, M.D.
, Mount Sinai Heart Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA

Low HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) is an established biomarker for the future development of atherosclerosis and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in population-based observational studies and clinical trials of cholesterol-lowering therapies and this includes coronary heart disease (CHD) patients with low levels of LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) on statin therapy. MORE»

CARDIAC TISSUE HYPOTHYROIDISM- A MAJOR PLAYER IN DIABETIC CARDIOMYOPATHY

Gerdes
A. Martin Gerdes, M.D.
, N.Y. Weltman, New York Institute of Technology, Old Westbury, NY, USA

Objectives and Background: Thyroid dysfunction is common in individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM) and may contribute to the associated cardiac dysfunction. However, little is known about the extent and pathophysiological consequences of low thyroid conditions on the heart in DM. MORE»

OXIDATIVE-MECHANICAL SIGNALING ACTIVATES Wnt3a-Lrp5 MEDIATED AORTIC VALVE OSTEOGENESIS IN BICUSPID AORTIC VALVE DISEASE

Rajamannan
Nalini M. Rajamannan, M.D., Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA

Introduction: Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is the most common indication for valve surgery in the USA. Cellular mechanisms are under intense investigation. This study hypothesizes that calcific aortic valve disease develops secondary to Wnt3a/Lrp5 activation via oxidative- mechanical stress via a tissue stem cell niche resident in the aortic valve. MORE»

FEMORAL OR RADIAL ACCESS FOR PRIMARY PCI: A DILEMMA OF CHOICE

Cheema
Asim N. Cheema, M.D., St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada

Several studies have shown significant reduction in bleeding and vascular complications with transradial percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) compared to a transfemoral approach. More recently, data from RIVAL and RIFLE-STEACS studies have suggested a mortality benefit in favor of transradial approach for patients undergoing PCI for ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). MORE»

TRENDS IN MANAGEMENT AND OUTCOME OF PATIENTS WITH ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROMES IN THE LAST DECADE: THE ACS ISRAELI SURVEY (ACSIS) EXPERIENCE

Gottlieb
Shmuel Gottlieb, M.D.
, Jerusalem, Israel

Background: The management of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) patients has undergone major changes during the last decade. These changes reflect the results of numerous controlled clinical trials that established the basis for evidence-based guidelines. MORE»

NON-INVASIVE CARDIOVASCULAR IMAGING FOR EVALUATION OF CORONARY ARTERY BYPASS GRAFT DISEASE

Elhendy
Abdou Elhendy, M.D., Ph.D
, Department of Cardiology, Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, WI, USA

Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery is a widely used method of revascularization in patients with severe coronary artery disease (CAD). Various studies have shown improvement of survival and cardiac symtoms after CABG, particularly in patients with low ejection fraction and multivessel CAD. MORE»

ADVANCES IN PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF DIASTOLIC HEART FAILURE

Chatterjee
Kanu Chatterjee, M.B., FRCP
, The Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA

Diastolic heart failure is defined as asyndrome of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPREF). In diastolic heart failure, left ventricular wall thickness and mass is increased and the cavity size is normal. The mass/cavity ratio is increased. MORE»

UPDATE ON THE TREATMENT OF LEFT MAIN DISEASE

Uretsky
Barry F. Uretsky, M.D.
, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA

Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug eluting stents (DES) has emerged as a treatment alternative with left main (LM) disease. Three randomized clinical trials (RCT) compared DES to coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). MORE»

INDICATIONS AND SURVIVAL OF 90 YEAR OLDS UNDERGOING CORONARY ANGIOGRAPHY

Sidhu Mandeep S. Sidhu, M.D., Albany Medical College, Albany, New York, USA

Background: The Elderly are the fastest growing segment of western population. 1 in 5 US Citizen will be elderly by the year 2030. Nonagenarians (>90 year old) are projected to grow to 18 million by the year 2050. MORE»

FLURPIRIDAZ F 18 PET VERSUS TC-99M SPECT FOR MYOCARDIAL PERFUSION IMAGING

Berman Daniel S. Berman, M.D., Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Flurpiridaz F-18, a new PET tracer for myocardial perfusion imaging has recently been studied in a Phase II trial. In pre-clinical and phase-I studies, flurpiridaz F-18 has shown essentially linear myocardial uptake throughout the range of flow. MORE»

Click here to see Invited Speaker Presentations from the
International Academy of Cardiology
Annual Scientific Sessions 2014
18th World Congress on Heart Disease

Click here to see Invited Speaker Presentations from the
International Academy of Cardiology
Annual Scientific Sessions 2013
17th World Congress on Heart Disease


Invited Speaker Presentations at the
17th World Congress on Heart Disease
(click on the photo to view the video)

 

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